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Title: Appendices of an appraisal for the use of geothermal energy in state-owned buildings in Colorado. Section E. Glenwood Springs

Abstract

The State Highway Department Buildings in Glenwood Springs have been evaluated in this appraisal for the use of geothermal energy in state-owned buildings. Glenwood Springs is the location of surface hot springs and has been assessed by various parties for several geothermal applications. The Glenwood Highway Department Buildings consist of an office building and a maintenance garage. These two building140 gpm. currently use an array of natural gas forced air furnaces and electric heaters for space/heating purpose; a propane unit is used for one water heater. Retrofit engineering for geothermal heating is based upon a central plate-in-frame heat exchanger coupled to several fan coil heaters and unit heaters. Design heating can be accomplished with 150/sup 0/F geothermal water at 140 gpm. The geothermal energy economics are evaluated for a single deep well, with and without a proration of the total production well cost for the required 140 gpm out of the 1000 gpm production capacity. Only the prorated well cost option provides an economically feasible geothermal system. The feasibility, therefore, depends on the use of the excess geothermal water by private or municipal facilities. The principal institutional/environmental issue for a geothermal heating sytem for the Highway Department Buildings is themore » question of whether or not the states owns the geothermal rights on the state property.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Colorado Geological Survey, Denver (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6535897
Report Number(s):
NP-3901251
ON: DE83901251
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; GEOTHERMAL DISTRICT HEATING; ECONOMICS; PUBLIC BUILDINGS; GEOTHERMAL SPACE HEATING; COLORADO; GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES; GEOTHERMAL WELLS; INSTITUTIONAL FACTORS; RESOURCE ASSESSMENT; RETROFITTING; BUILDINGS; DISTRICT HEATING; FEDERAL REGION VIII; GEOTHERMAL HEATING; HEATING; NORTH AMERICA; RESOURCES; SPACE HEATING; USA; WELLS; Geothermal Legacy; 151000* - Geothermal Energy- Direct Energy Utilization

Citation Formats

Meyer, R T, Coe, B A, and Dick, J D. Appendices of an appraisal for the use of geothermal energy in state-owned buildings in Colorado. Section E. Glenwood Springs. United States: N. p., 1981. Web. doi:10.2172/6535897.
Meyer, R T, Coe, B A, & Dick, J D. Appendices of an appraisal for the use of geothermal energy in state-owned buildings in Colorado. Section E. Glenwood Springs. United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/6535897
Meyer, R T, Coe, B A, and Dick, J D. 1981. "Appendices of an appraisal for the use of geothermal energy in state-owned buildings in Colorado. Section E. Glenwood Springs". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/6535897. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/6535897.
@article{osti_6535897,
title = {Appendices of an appraisal for the use of geothermal energy in state-owned buildings in Colorado. Section E. Glenwood Springs},
author = {Meyer, R T and Coe, B A and Dick, J D},
abstractNote = {The State Highway Department Buildings in Glenwood Springs have been evaluated in this appraisal for the use of geothermal energy in state-owned buildings. Glenwood Springs is the location of surface hot springs and has been assessed by various parties for several geothermal applications. The Glenwood Highway Department Buildings consist of an office building and a maintenance garage. These two building140 gpm. currently use an array of natural gas forced air furnaces and electric heaters for space/heating purpose; a propane unit is used for one water heater. Retrofit engineering for geothermal heating is based upon a central plate-in-frame heat exchanger coupled to several fan coil heaters and unit heaters. Design heating can be accomplished with 150/sup 0/F geothermal water at 140 gpm. The geothermal energy economics are evaluated for a single deep well, with and without a proration of the total production well cost for the required 140 gpm out of the 1000 gpm production capacity. Only the prorated well cost option provides an economically feasible geothermal system. The feasibility, therefore, depends on the use of the excess geothermal water by private or municipal facilities. The principal institutional/environmental issue for a geothermal heating sytem for the Highway Department Buildings is the question of whether or not the states owns the geothermal rights on the state property.},
doi = {10.2172/6535897},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/6535897}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1981},
month = {1}
}