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Title: Design report small-scale fuel alcohol plant. Volume II. Detailed construction information

Abstract

The objectives of the report are to (a) provide potential alcohol producers with a reference design and (b) provide a complete, demonstrated design of a small-scale fuel alcohol plant. This report describes a small-scale fuel alcohol plant designed and constructed for the DOE by EG and G Idaho, Inc., an operating contractor at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The plant is reasonably complete, having the capability for feedstock preparation, cooking, saccharification, fermentation, distillation, by-product dewatering, and process steam generation. An interesting feature is an instrumentation and control system designed to allow the plant to run 24 hours per day with only four hours of operator attention. Where possible, this document follows the design requirements established in the DOE publication Fuel From Farms, which was published in February 1980. For instance, critical requirements such as using corn as the primary feedstock, production of 25 gallons of 190 proof ethanol per hour, and using batch fermentation were taken from Fuel From Farms. One significant deviation is alcohol dehydration. Fuel From Farms recommends the use of a molecular sieve for dehydration, but a preliminary design raised significant questions about the cost effectiveness of this approach. A cost trade-off study is currently under waymore » to establish the best alcohol dehydration method and will be the subject of a later report. Volume two includes equipment and instrumentation data sheets, instrument loop wiring diagrams, and vendor lists.« less

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6534825
Report Number(s):
IDO-10088(Vol.2)
DOE Contract Number:
AC07-76ID01570
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; 42 ENGINEERING; BIOMASS CONVERSION PLANTS; DESIGN; EQUIPMENT; CONSTRUCTION; DIAGRAMS; DISTILLATION; ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS; ETHANOL; FERMENTATION; HEAT EXCHANGERS; HEAT TREATMENTS; IDAHO; MAIZE; MEASURING INSTRUMENTS; MICROPROCESSORS; PROCESS CONTROL; PRODUCTION; PUMPS; SPECIFICATIONS; TANKS; VALVES; ALCOHOLS; BIOCONVERSION; CEREALS; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; COMPUTERS; CONTAINERS; CONTROL; CONTROL EQUIPMENT; DECOMPOSITION; ELECTRONIC CIRCUITS; FLOW REGULATORS; GRAMINEAE; GRASS; HYDROLYSIS; HYDROXY COMPOUNDS; LYSIS; MICROELECTRONIC CIRCUITS; NORTH AMERICA; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; PACIFIC NORTHWEST REGION; PLANTS; SEPARATION PROCESSES; SOLVOLYSIS; USA; 140504* - Solar Energy Conversion- Biomass Production & Conversion- (-1989); 090222 - Alcohol Fuels- Preparation from Wastes or Biomass- (1976-1989); 420200 - Engineering- Facilities, Equipment, & Techniques

Citation Formats

Not Available. Design report small-scale fuel alcohol plant. Volume II. Detailed construction information. United States: N. p., 1980. Web.
Not Available. Design report small-scale fuel alcohol plant. Volume II. Detailed construction information. United States.
Not Available. 1980. "Design report small-scale fuel alcohol plant. Volume II. Detailed construction information". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6534825,
title = {Design report small-scale fuel alcohol plant. Volume II. Detailed construction information},
author = {Not Available},
abstractNote = {The objectives of the report are to (a) provide potential alcohol producers with a reference design and (b) provide a complete, demonstrated design of a small-scale fuel alcohol plant. This report describes a small-scale fuel alcohol plant designed and constructed for the DOE by EG and G Idaho, Inc., an operating contractor at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The plant is reasonably complete, having the capability for feedstock preparation, cooking, saccharification, fermentation, distillation, by-product dewatering, and process steam generation. An interesting feature is an instrumentation and control system designed to allow the plant to run 24 hours per day with only four hours of operator attention. Where possible, this document follows the design requirements established in the DOE publication Fuel From Farms, which was published in February 1980. For instance, critical requirements such as using corn as the primary feedstock, production of 25 gallons of 190 proof ethanol per hour, and using batch fermentation were taken from Fuel From Farms. One significant deviation is alcohol dehydration. Fuel From Farms recommends the use of a molecular sieve for dehydration, but a preliminary design raised significant questions about the cost effectiveness of this approach. A cost trade-off study is currently under way to establish the best alcohol dehydration method and will be the subject of a later report. Volume two includes equipment and instrumentation data sheets, instrument loop wiring diagrams, and vendor lists.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1980,
month =
}

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  • This volume contains technical information about the equipment used in the Small Scale Fuel Alcohol Plant (SSFAP). Details are provided in the form of data sheets for off-the-shelf mechanical equipment and instrumentation. A specification is also included for a microprocessor. Complete drawings are included for mechanical hardware specifically designed for this plant. The information is arranged with all instrument and equipment data sheets grouped by the type of equipment. Vendor listings are provided for each type of equipment required. The design in this report represents the design after startup testing and some short periods of operation but before continuous productionmore » began. It is expected that a person or firm desiring to build a similar plant would hire a consultant or architect-engineering firm to modify this design to fit the specific application and site.« less
  • This volume contains general information about the construction of the Small-Scale Fuel Alcohol Plant (SSFAP). Suggested design changes are listed: it is recommended that anyone planning to build a plant similar to this one consider incorporating these changes. The construction information included here consists of photographs of the plant, a list of important mechanical construction details, electrical drawings showing the power distribution schematic, and end-to-end wiring schematics for the plant control. The photographs show the relative locations of major equipment and can be used in conjunction with the Piping and Instrumentation Diagrams (P and IDs) in Appendix E of Volumemore » 1 to physicaly lay out the plant. The design in this volume represents the design after startup testing and some short periods of operation but before continuous production began. It is expected that a person or firm desiring to build a similar plant would hire a consultant or architect-engineering firm.« less
  • The objectives of the report are to (a) provide potential alcohol producers with a reference design and (b) provide a complete, demonstrated design of a small-scale fuel alcohol plant. This report describes a small-scale fuel alcohol plant designed and constructed for the DOE by EG and G Idaho, Inc., an operating contractor at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The plant is reasonably complete, having the capability for feedstock preparation, cooking, saccharification, fermentation, distillation, by-product dewatering, and process steam generation. An interesting feature is an instrumentation and control system designed to allow the plant to run 24 hours per day withmore » only four hours of operator attention. Where possible, this document follows the design requirements established in the DOE publication Fuel From Farms, which was published in February 1980. For instance, critical requirements such as using corn as the primary feedstock, production of 25 gallons of 190 proof ethanol per hour, and using batch fermentation were taken from Fuel From Farms. One significant deviation is alcohol dehydration. Fuel From Farms recommends the use of a molecular sieve for dehydration, but a preliminary design raised significant questions about the cost effectiveness of this approach. A cost trade-off study is currently under way to establish the best alcohol dehydration method and will be the subject of a later report. Volume one contains background information and a general description of the plant and process.« less
  • This report describes a small-scale fuel alcohol plant designed and constructed for the DOE by EG and G Idaho, Inc., an operating contractor at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The plant is reasonably complete, having the capability for feedstock preparation, cooking, saccharification, fermentation, distillation, byproduct dewatering, and process steam generation. An interesting feature is an instrumentation and control system designed to allow the plant to run 24 hours per day with only four hours of operator attention. The production designed capacity of the plant is 26.4 gallons of 190-proof ethanol per hour. Most of the processes and equipment used inmore » the plant represent conventional ethanol production technology. Two slight deviations are the control system, which is common in larger plants, and the continuous cooker, which was adapted from the food industry. A device for dewatering the by-product is included, but a byproduct drying system was not, because systems evaluated were too expensive for a plant of this size. Alcohol dehydration was not included for the same reason. Commerical molecular sieve units are now available at costs that allow economic drying of ethanol. Evaluations are underway to install a commercially available molecular sieve unit at this plant.« less
  • The objectives of the report are to (a) provide potential alcohol producers with a reference design and (b) provide a complete, demonstrated design of small-scale fuel alcohol plant. This report describes a small-scale fuel alcohol plant designed and constructed for the DOE by EG and G Idaho, Inc., an operating contractor at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The plant is reasonably complete, having the capability for feedstock preparation, cooking, saccharification, fermentation, distillation, by-product dewatering, and process steam generation. An interesting feature is an instrumentation and control system designed to allow the plant to run 24 hours per day with onlymore » four hours of operator attention. Where possible, this document follows the design requirements established in the DOE publication Fuel From Farms, which was published in February 1980. For instance, critical requirements such as using corn as the primary feedstock, production of 25 gallons of 190 proof ethanol per hour, and using batch fermentation were taken from Fuel From Farms. One significant deviation is alcohol dehydration. Fuel From Farms recommends the use of a molecular sieve for dehydration, but a preliminary design raised significant questions about the cost effectiveness of this approach. A cost trade-off study is currently under way to establish the best alcohol dehydration method and will be the subject of a later report. This volume contains the equipment and construction drawings used to build the small-scale ethanol plant. The design in this volume represents the design at completion of construction and before continuous production began.« less