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Title: Artificial intelligence and simulation

Abstract

The research and development of AI are discussed. Papers are presented on an expert system for chemical process control, an ocean surveillance information fusion expert system, a distributed intelligence system and aircraft pilotage, a procedure for speeding innovation by transferring scientific knowledge more quickly, and syntax programming, expert systems, and real-time fault diagnosis. Consideration is given to an expert system for modeling NASA flight control room usage, simulating aphasia, a method for single neuron recognition of letters, numbers, faces, and certain types of concepts, integrating AI and control system approach, testing an expert system for manufacturing, and the human memory.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6505468
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 6505468
Resource Type:
Book
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; CONTROL THEORY; EXPERT SYSTEMS; LEADING ABSTRACT; PROCESS CONTROL; PSYCHOLOGY; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; SIMULATION; USES; ABSTRACTS; CONTROL; DOCUMENT TYPES 990210* -- Supercomputers-- (1987-1989)

Citation Formats

Holmes, W.M. Artificial intelligence and simulation. United States: N. p., 1985. Web.
Holmes, W.M. Artificial intelligence and simulation. United States.
Holmes, W.M. Tue . "Artificial intelligence and simulation". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6505468,
title = {Artificial intelligence and simulation},
author = {Holmes, W.M.},
abstractNote = {The research and development of AI are discussed. Papers are presented on an expert system for chemical process control, an ocean surveillance information fusion expert system, a distributed intelligence system and aircraft pilotage, a procedure for speeding innovation by transferring scientific knowledge more quickly, and syntax programming, expert systems, and real-time fault diagnosis. Consideration is given to an expert system for modeling NASA flight control room usage, simulating aphasia, a method for single neuron recognition of letters, numbers, faces, and certain types of concepts, integrating AI and control system approach, testing an expert system for manufacturing, and the human memory.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1985},
month = {Tue Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1985}
}

Book:
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