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Title: Environment, energy and economy: Strategies for sustainability

Abstract

This book deals with short-term and long-term issues associated with directions of economic development in developing as well as industrialized countries. It examines various aspects of the interrelationships among the environment, energy requirements, and economic development. It emphasizes the increasing environmental stress arising from such human activities as growing energy consumption associated with economic development; the risk of further environmental degradation due to economic development in developing countries; the importance of global environmental problems such as climate change resulting from greenhouse gas emissions; the role of new technologies in solving the trilemma of energy demand, economic development; and the need for removing technological, economic, and social barriers to achieving sustainable development. It underscores the need for further scientific information and analytical studies, such as improved climate and econometric modeling.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Aspen Inst., Washington, DC (United States); Brookings Institution, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
650045
Report Number(s):
BROOK-0356/XAB
ISBN 92-808-0911-3; TRN: 98:010180
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Jan 1998
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING AND POLICY; ENERGY POLICY; ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT; ECONOMIC POLICY; DEVELOPING COUNTRIES; GLOBAL ASPECTS; EMISSION; GREENHOUSE GASES; ENERGY DEMAND; ENERGY CONSUMPTION

Citation Formats

Kaya, Y., and Yokobori, K.. Environment, energy and economy: Strategies for sustainability. United States: N. p., 1998. Web.
Kaya, Y., & Yokobori, K.. Environment, energy and economy: Strategies for sustainability. United States.
Kaya, Y., and Yokobori, K.. Thu . "Environment, energy and economy: Strategies for sustainability". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_650045,
title = {Environment, energy and economy: Strategies for sustainability},
author = {Kaya, Y. and Yokobori, K.},
abstractNote = {This book deals with short-term and long-term issues associated with directions of economic development in developing as well as industrialized countries. It examines various aspects of the interrelationships among the environment, energy requirements, and economic development. It emphasizes the increasing environmental stress arising from such human activities as growing energy consumption associated with economic development; the risk of further environmental degradation due to economic development in developing countries; the importance of global environmental problems such as climate change resulting from greenhouse gas emissions; the role of new technologies in solving the trilemma of energy demand, economic development; and the need for removing technological, economic, and social barriers to achieving sustainable development. It underscores the need for further scientific information and analytical studies, such as improved climate and econometric modeling.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1998},
month = {Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1998}
}

Technical Report:
Other availability
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