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Title: Oil, Japan, and globalization

Abstract

Today, the globalization of the international economy is nowhere as evident and complete as in the oil industry. Indeed, the production, distribution, and pricing of oil have already been infused into a transnational network of interconnected, transparent, and competitive markets. This sort of market arrangement, unlike its previous cartelized counterpart, rests upon a highly globalized economic framework whose very existence discourages a need for Western military intervention for the sake of oil. Returning to the bygone era, and judging the oil business accordingly, would create an impression that nothing has changed. This article describes the conflict of hegemony between the U.S. and Japan in the context of the global oil market.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States))
OSTI Identifier:
6499701
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Challenge; (United States)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 37:3; Journal ID: ISSN 0577-5132
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; JAPAN; INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS; PETROLEUM; MARKET; USA; POLITICAL ASPECTS; ASIA; DEVELOPED COUNTRIES; ENERGY SOURCES; FOSSIL FUELS; FUELS; INSTITUTIONAL FACTORS; NORTH AMERICA; 290200* - Energy Planning & Policy- Economics & Sociology

Citation Formats

Bina, C. Oil, Japan, and globalization. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1080/05775132.1994.11471746.
Bina, C. Oil, Japan, and globalization. United States. doi:10.1080/05775132.1994.11471746.
Bina, C. . "Oil, Japan, and globalization". United States. doi:10.1080/05775132.1994.11471746.
@article{osti_6499701,
title = {Oil, Japan, and globalization},
author = {Bina, C.},
abstractNote = {Today, the globalization of the international economy is nowhere as evident and complete as in the oil industry. Indeed, the production, distribution, and pricing of oil have already been infused into a transnational network of interconnected, transparent, and competitive markets. This sort of market arrangement, unlike its previous cartelized counterpart, rests upon a highly globalized economic framework whose very existence discourages a need for Western military intervention for the sake of oil. Returning to the bygone era, and judging the oil business accordingly, would create an impression that nothing has changed. This article describes the conflict of hegemony between the U.S. and Japan in the context of the global oil market.},
doi = {10.1080/05775132.1994.11471746},
journal = {Challenge; (United States)},
issn = {0577-5132},
number = ,
volume = 37:3,
place = {United States},
year = {},
month = {}
}