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Title: Treatment of aggressive multiple myeloma by high-dose chemotherapy and total body irradiation followed by blood stem cells autologous graft

Abstract

Eight patients with stage III aggressive multiple myeloma, refractory to current chemotherapy in six cases, were treated by high-dose chemotherapy (nitrosourea, etoposide, and melphalan) (HDC) and total body irradiation (TBI), followed by autografting with blood stem cells. These cells were previously collected by leukapheresis performed during hematologic recovery following cytotoxic drug-induced bone marrow aplasia. Seven patients were alive 9 to 17 months after HDC-TBI and graft. One died at day 40 from cerebral bleeding. All living patients achieved a 90% or greater reduction in tumor mass. In two cases, a complete remission (CR) has persisted at a follow-up of 15 and 16 months. Three patients have been well and off therapy with stable minimal residual disease (RD) since 10, 11, and 17 months, respectively. A patient in apparent CR and another with RD have relapsed 9 to 12 months posttreatment. Autologous blood-derived hematopoietic stem cells induced successful and sustained engraftment in all living patients. These results, although still preliminary, indicate that HDC and TBI, followed by blood stem cells autograft, which has both practical and theoretical interest over allogeneic or autologous bone marrow transplantation, deserve consideration in selected patients with multiple myeloma.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Service d'Hematologie et d'Immunohematologie, Paris (France)
OSTI Identifier:
6497993
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Blood; (United States); Journal Volume: 73:1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; NEOPLASMS; COMBINED THERAPY; STEM CELLS; TRANSPLANTS; PATIENTS; SURVIVAL CURVES; WHOLE-BODY IRRADIATION; ANIMAL CELLS; DISEASES; EXTERNAL IRRADIATION; IRRADIATION; SOMATIC CELLS; THERAPY; 550603* - Medicine- External Radiation in Therapy- (1980-); 550600 - Medicine

Citation Formats

Fermand, J.P., Levy, Y., Gerota, J., Benbunan, M., Cosset, J.M., Castaigne, S., Seligmann, M., and Brouet, J.C. Treatment of aggressive multiple myeloma by high-dose chemotherapy and total body irradiation followed by blood stem cells autologous graft. United States: N. p., 1989. Web.
Fermand, J.P., Levy, Y., Gerota, J., Benbunan, M., Cosset, J.M., Castaigne, S., Seligmann, M., & Brouet, J.C. Treatment of aggressive multiple myeloma by high-dose chemotherapy and total body irradiation followed by blood stem cells autologous graft. United States.
Fermand, J.P., Levy, Y., Gerota, J., Benbunan, M., Cosset, J.M., Castaigne, S., Seligmann, M., and Brouet, J.C. Sun . "Treatment of aggressive multiple myeloma by high-dose chemotherapy and total body irradiation followed by blood stem cells autologous graft". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6497993,
title = {Treatment of aggressive multiple myeloma by high-dose chemotherapy and total body irradiation followed by blood stem cells autologous graft},
author = {Fermand, J.P. and Levy, Y. and Gerota, J. and Benbunan, M. and Cosset, J.M. and Castaigne, S. and Seligmann, M. and Brouet, J.C.},
abstractNote = {Eight patients with stage III aggressive multiple myeloma, refractory to current chemotherapy in six cases, were treated by high-dose chemotherapy (nitrosourea, etoposide, and melphalan) (HDC) and total body irradiation (TBI), followed by autografting with blood stem cells. These cells were previously collected by leukapheresis performed during hematologic recovery following cytotoxic drug-induced bone marrow aplasia. Seven patients were alive 9 to 17 months after HDC-TBI and graft. One died at day 40 from cerebral bleeding. All living patients achieved a 90% or greater reduction in tumor mass. In two cases, a complete remission (CR) has persisted at a follow-up of 15 and 16 months. Three patients have been well and off therapy with stable minimal residual disease (RD) since 10, 11, and 17 months, respectively. A patient in apparent CR and another with RD have relapsed 9 to 12 months posttreatment. Autologous blood-derived hematopoietic stem cells induced successful and sustained engraftment in all living patients. These results, although still preliminary, indicate that HDC and TBI, followed by blood stem cells autograft, which has both practical and theoretical interest over allogeneic or autologous bone marrow transplantation, deserve consideration in selected patients with multiple myeloma.},
doi = {},
journal = {Blood; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 73:1,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1989},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1989}
}
  • Pulmonary function tests (standard vital capacity, SVC; total lung capacity, TLC; forced expiratory volume in 1 second-forced vital capacity ratio, FEV1/FVC; carbon monoxide transfer factor, DLCO) were prospectively evaluated in patients (median age 25 years, 13-52 years; median follow-up 20 months, 6-51 months) with Hodgkin's disease (15 patients), non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (9 patients), and inflammatory breast cancer (3 patients) treated with sequential high-dose therapy comprising the following phases over approximately 2 months: (a) cyclophosphamide (7 g/m2); (b) vincristine (1.4 mg/m2), methotrexate (8 g/m2), and cisplatinum (120 mg/m2) or etoposide (2 g/m2); (c) total body irradiation (TBI; 12.5 gy, 5 fractions overmore » 48 hours), intravenous melphalan (120-180 mg/m2), and transplantation of autologous peripheral blood and/or bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells. Within 2 months after transplantation, 12 patients also received 25 Gy radiotherapy boost to mediastinum and clavicular regions. In vivo dosimetry evaluations of fractionated TBI treatments showed that mean radiation dose absorbed by lungs was 12.18 Gy (97.4% of TBI dose). Despite such a high radiation dose, we observed only transient and subclinical decrease of SVC, TLC, and DLCO. The decrease of SVC, TLC, and DLCO was more evident and prolonged in patients receiving radiotherapy boost. All parameters progressively recovered to normal values within 2 years after transplantation. In contrast, FEV1/FVC remained within normal limits in all patients, thus demonstrating the absence of obstructive ventilatory changes. In addition, no interstitial pneumonia was observed.« less
  • Purpose: The optimal preparative regimen for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients undergoing autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) is unknown. We compared a total body irradiation (TBI)-based regimen with a chemotherapy-alone regimen. Methods and Materials: A retrospective cohort study was performed at a Canadian cancer center. The TBI regimen consisted of cyclophosphamide, etoposide, and TBI 12 Gy in six fractions (CY/E/TBI). The chemotherapy-alone regimen consisted of carmustine, etoposide, cytarabine, and melphalan (BEAM). We compared the acute and long-term toxicities, disease relapse-free survival, and overall survival (OS). Results: Of 73 patients, 26 received CY/E/TBI and 47 received BEAM. The median follow-up formore » the CY/E/TBI group was 12.0 years and for the BEAM group was 7.3 years. After PBSCT, no differences in acute toxicity were seen between the two groups. The 5-year disease relapse-free survival rate was 50.0% and 50.7% in the CY/E/TBI and BEAM groups, respectively (p = .808). The 5-year OS rate was 53.9% and 63.8% for the CY/E/TBI and BEAM groups, respectivey (p = .492). The univariate analysis results indicated that patients with Stage IV, with chemotherapy-resistant disease, and who had received PBSCT before 2000 had inferior OS. A three-way categorical analysis revealed that transplantation before 2000, rather than the conditioning regimen, was a more important predictive factor of long-term outcome (p = .034). Conclusion: A 12-Gy TBI-based conditioning regimen for PBSCT for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma resulted in disease relapse-free survival and OS similar to that after BEAM. PBSCT before 2000, and not the conditioning regimen, was an important predictor of long-term outcomes. TBI was not associated with more acute toxicity or pneumonitis. We found no indication that the TBI regimen was inferior or superior to BEAM.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate results of high-dose total-body irradiation (TBI) regimens for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Methods and Materials: A total of 1,032 patients underwent TBI in one or two fractions before autologous or allogeneic hematologic stem cell transplantation for acute leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The TBI regimens were normalized by using the biological effective dose (BED) concept. The BED values were divided into three dose groups. Study end points were relapse incidence (RI), non-relapse mortality (NRM), relapse-free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS). Multivariate analysis was performed, stratified by disease. Results: In the highest TBI dose group, RI was significantlymore » lower and NRM was higher vs. the lower dose groups. However, a significant influence on RFS and OS was not found. Relapses in the eye region were found only after shielding to very low doses. Age was of significant influence on OS, RFS, and NRM in favor of younger patients. The NRM of patients older than 40 years significantly increased, and OS decreased. There was no influence of age on RI. Men had better OS and RFS and lower NRM. Type of transplantation significantly influenced RI and NRM for patients with acute leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. There was no influence on RFS and OS. Conclusions: Both RI and NRM were significantly influenced by the size of the BED of single-dose or two-fraction TBI regimens; OS and RFS were not. Age was of highly significant influence on NRM, but there was no influence of age on RI. Hyperfractionated TBI with a high BED might be useful, assuming NRM can be reduced.« less
  • The restoration of immune functions was followed in dogs for 101 days after fractionated total body irradiation and autologous transfusion of peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) or bone marrow (BM) cells. Median numbers of 0.9 X 10(5) granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells per kilogram of body weight were transferred in either group of recipients. The following parameters recovered more rapidly in PBL recipients as opposed to BM recipients: total blood lymphocyte, T- and B-cell counts, serum levels of immunoglobulins IgM and IgA, in vitro blastogenic responses after stimulation with concanavalin A and pokeweed mitogen, and in vitro plasma cell formation after polyclonal B-cellmore » activation with pokeweed mitogen with or without lipopolysaccharide. No major differences were noted for the restoration of serum IgG levels. Circulating lymphocyte and T-cell numbers remained subnormal for more than three months in both groups, whereas B-cell numbers and serum levels of IgA continued to be depressed in BM recipients only. Thus, autologous PBL restored immune functions more rapidly than did BM. Transplantation of PBL, alone or in addition to autologous BM, might also shorten the period of immunodeficiency after cytoreduction in a variety of malignancies in man.« less
  • Beagle dogs treated by total-body irradiation (TBI) were given autologous marrow grafts in order to avoid death from marrow toxicity. Acute and delayed non-marrow toxicities of high single-dose (27 dogs) and fractionated TBI (20 dogs) delivered at 0.05 or 0.1 Gy/min were compared. Fractionated TBI was given in increments of 2 Gy every 6 hr for three increments per day. Acute toxicity and early mortality (<1 month) at identical total irradiation doses were comparable for dogs given fractionated or single-dose TBI. With single-dose TBI, 14, 16, and 18 Gy, respectively, given at 0.05 Gy/min, 0/5, 5/5, and 2/2 dogs diedmore » from acute toxicity; with 10, 12, and 14 Gy, respectively, given at 0.1 Gy/min, 1/5, 4/5, and 5/5 dogs died acutely. With fractionated TBI, 14 and 16 Gy, respectively, given at 0.1 Gy/min, 1/5, 4/5, and 2/2 dogs died auctely. Early deaths were due to radiation enteritis with or without associated septicemia (29 dogs; less than or equal to Day 10). Three dogs given 10 Gy of TBI at 0.1 Gy/min died from bacterial pneumonia; one (Day 18) had been given fractionated and two (Days 14, 22) single-dose TBI. Fifteen dogs survived beyond 1 month; eight of these had single-dose TBI (10-14 Gy) and all died within 7 months of irradiation from a syndrome consisting of hepatic damage, pancreatic fibrosis, malnutrition, wasting, and anemia. Seven of the 15 had fractionated TBI, and only one (14 Gy) died on Day 33 from hepatic failure, whereas 6 (10-14 Gy) are alive and well 250 to 500 days after irradiation. In conclusion, fractionated TBI did not offer advantages over single-dose TBI with regard to acute toxicity and early mortality; rather, these were dependent upon the total dose of TBI. The total acutely tolerated dose was dependent upon the exposure rate; however, only dogs given fractionated TBI became healthy long-term survivors.« less