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Title: Comparison of the hydrothermal stability of simulated spent fuel and borosilicate glass in a basaltic environment

Abstract

Simulated spent fuel and borosilicate glass (PNL 76-68) were hydrothermally reacted with Umtanum basalt under test conditions simulating expected conditions for a nuclear waste repository located in basalt (NWRB) at the Hanford Site, Washington. Tests were performed in gold-bag sampling autoclaves at temperatures between 100/sup 0/C and 300/sup 0/C, 300 bars pressure, and a variety of mass ratios for the solids and groundwater. Systematic solution analyses included monitoring of pH, Eh, and dissolved concentrations of both matrix elements and potential radionuclides (as stable analog elements). All dissolved species displayed either steady-state concentration limits or decreasing concentration behavior after the first several hundred hours. Solids characterization suggests that formation of secondary alteration solids, such as alkali feldspar, smectite clays, scapolite, and a variety of uranium-rich silicate phases, impose solubility limits to the release of many potential radioactive elements. These steady-state (or solubility) concentration limits can be coupled with measured hydrologic flow rates to calculate meaningful radionuclide release rates from the waste form for a NWRB. It should be noted that comparison of waste forms from hydrothermal test results is limited by the chemical and structural disparity of the waste forms. Because of this disparity, each waste form will buffer the reactingmore » system at different environmental conditions (e.g., pH, Eh) and, thus, the secondary solids that control radionuclide concentration levels will be necessarily different for each system. Emphasis on the stability of precipitated radionuclide-bearing solids (fate of radionuclides) is the preferred method of performance assessment.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Rockwell International Corp., Richland, WA (USA). Rockwell Hanford Operations
OSTI Identifier:
6467962
Report Number(s):
RHO-BW-ST-38-P
ON: DE83010203
DOE Contract Number:  
AC06-77RL01030
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; BASALT; WASTE-ROCK INTERACTIONS; BOROSILICATE GLASS; SPENT FUELS; EXPERIMENTAL DATA; HANFORD RESERVATION; HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION; SOLUBILITY; WASHINGTON; DATA; ENERGY SOURCES; FEDERAL REGION X; FUELS; GLASS; IGNEOUS ROCKS; INFORMATION; MATERIALS; NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS; NORTH AMERICA; NUCLEAR FUELS; NUMERICAL DATA; REACTOR MATERIALS; ROCKS; US DOE; US ERDA; US ORGANIZATIONS; USA; VOLCANIC ROCKS; 052002* - Nuclear Fuels- Waste Disposal & Storage

Citation Formats

Apted, M.J., and Myers, J. Comparison of the hydrothermal stability of simulated spent fuel and borosilicate glass in a basaltic environment. United States: N. p., 1982. Web.
Apted, M.J., & Myers, J. Comparison of the hydrothermal stability of simulated spent fuel and borosilicate glass in a basaltic environment. United States.
Apted, M.J., and Myers, J. Thu . "Comparison of the hydrothermal stability of simulated spent fuel and borosilicate glass in a basaltic environment". United States.
@article{osti_6467962,
title = {Comparison of the hydrothermal stability of simulated spent fuel and borosilicate glass in a basaltic environment},
author = {Apted, M.J. and Myers, J.},
abstractNote = {Simulated spent fuel and borosilicate glass (PNL 76-68) were hydrothermally reacted with Umtanum basalt under test conditions simulating expected conditions for a nuclear waste repository located in basalt (NWRB) at the Hanford Site, Washington. Tests were performed in gold-bag sampling autoclaves at temperatures between 100/sup 0/C and 300/sup 0/C, 300 bars pressure, and a variety of mass ratios for the solids and groundwater. Systematic solution analyses included monitoring of pH, Eh, and dissolved concentrations of both matrix elements and potential radionuclides (as stable analog elements). All dissolved species displayed either steady-state concentration limits or decreasing concentration behavior after the first several hundred hours. Solids characterization suggests that formation of secondary alteration solids, such as alkali feldspar, smectite clays, scapolite, and a variety of uranium-rich silicate phases, impose solubility limits to the release of many potential radioactive elements. These steady-state (or solubility) concentration limits can be coupled with measured hydrologic flow rates to calculate meaningful radionuclide release rates from the waste form for a NWRB. It should be noted that comparison of waste forms from hydrothermal test results is limited by the chemical and structural disparity of the waste forms. Because of this disparity, each waste form will buffer the reacting system at different environmental conditions (e.g., pH, Eh) and, thus, the secondary solids that control radionuclide concentration levels will be necessarily different for each system. Emphasis on the stability of precipitated radionuclide-bearing solids (fate of radionuclides) is the preferred method of performance assessment.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1982},
month = {7}
}

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