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Title: Evaluation of hazardous waste incineration in a lime kiln: Rockwell Lime Company. Final report

Abstract

During a one-week test burn, hazardous waste was used as supplemental fuel and co-fired with petroleum coke in a lime kiln in eastern Wisconsin. Detailed sampling and analysis was conducted on the stack gas for principal organic hazardous constituents (POHCs), particulates, particulate metals, HCl, SO2, NOx, CO, and THC and on process streams for metals and chlorine. POHCs were also analyzed in the waste fuel. Sampling was conducted during three baseline and five waste fuel test burn days. The program objectives were to determine the destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) for each POHC, determine concentration of stack gas pollutants under baseline and waste fuel test burn conditions, determine the fate of chlorine, sulfur, and trace metals in the kiln process, and evaluate kiln performance when operating with hazardous waste as supplemental fuel. Results show average DRE's greater than 99.99 percent for each POHC and little change in pollutant emissions from baseline to waste fuel test conditions. In addition, material balance results show that 95 percent of chlorine enters the process from the limestone feed and the chlorine exits the kiln in the baghouse dust and lime product at 61 percent and 38 percent, respectively.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Monsanto Research Corp., Dayton, OH (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6455015
Report Number(s):
PB-84-230044
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; FLUE GAS; CHEMICAL COMPOSITION; INCINERATORS; PERFORMANCE TESTING; BURNERS; CARBON MONOXIDE; CHEMICAL EFFLUENTS; CHIMNEYS; FUEL SUBSTITUTION; HAZARDOUS MATERIALS; HYDROCARBONS; METALS; NITROGEN OXIDES; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; PARTICULATES; SAMPLING; SULFUR DIOXIDE; CARBON COMPOUNDS; CARBON OXIDES; CHALCOGENIDES; ELEMENTS; GASEOUS WASTES; MATERIALS; NITROGEN COMPOUNDS; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; PARTICLES; SULFUR COMPOUNDS; SULFUR OXIDES; TESTING; WASTES 500200* -- Environment, Atmospheric-- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport-- (-1989)

Citation Formats

Day, D.R., and Cox, L.A. Evaluation of hazardous waste incineration in a lime kiln: Rockwell Lime Company. Final report. United States: N. p., 1984. Web.
Day, D.R., & Cox, L.A. Evaluation of hazardous waste incineration in a lime kiln: Rockwell Lime Company. Final report. United States.
Day, D.R., and Cox, L.A. 1984. "Evaluation of hazardous waste incineration in a lime kiln: Rockwell Lime Company. Final report". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6455015,
title = {Evaluation of hazardous waste incineration in a lime kiln: Rockwell Lime Company. Final report},
author = {Day, D.R. and Cox, L.A.},
abstractNote = {During a one-week test burn, hazardous waste was used as supplemental fuel and co-fired with petroleum coke in a lime kiln in eastern Wisconsin. Detailed sampling and analysis was conducted on the stack gas for principal organic hazardous constituents (POHCs), particulates, particulate metals, HCl, SO2, NOx, CO, and THC and on process streams for metals and chlorine. POHCs were also analyzed in the waste fuel. Sampling was conducted during three baseline and five waste fuel test burn days. The program objectives were to determine the destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) for each POHC, determine concentration of stack gas pollutants under baseline and waste fuel test burn conditions, determine the fate of chlorine, sulfur, and trace metals in the kiln process, and evaluate kiln performance when operating with hazardous waste as supplemental fuel. Results show average DRE's greater than 99.99 percent for each POHC and little change in pollutant emissions from baseline to waste fuel test conditions. In addition, material balance results show that 95 percent of chlorine enters the process from the limestone feed and the chlorine exits the kiln in the baghouse dust and lime product at 61 percent and 38 percent, respectively.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1984,
month = 8
}

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