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Title: Essential trace metals in man: selenium

Abstract

In order to obtain data on environmental sources and human exposures to selenium, a trace element essential for mammals, a number of common foods, wild and domestic animal tissues and tissues of human beings were analyzed by a photofluorometric technique. Selenium was found in few vegetables, but seafood, meats and most grains contained appreciable amounts. The daily intake in a standard diet was 62..mu..g. Cooked and processed foods contained considerably less selenium than raw foods. The calculated human body burden of selenium was 14.6 mg (range 13-20 mg). Wild animals contained two to three times as high a concentration of selenium as the human beings analyzed. Kidneys showed the highest concentrations. Selenium did not accumulate in human hair with age, but increased in hair of rats fed selenate. Under some conditions, selenium is carcinogenic in rats. No recorded case of human or animal cancer is known which could be attributed to environmental selenium, or the lack of it.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Dartmouth Medical School, NH
OSTI Identifier:
6424964
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: J. Chronic Dis.; (United States); Journal Volume: 23
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; SELENIUM; BODY BURDEN; TISSUE DISTRIBUTION; ANIMAL TISSUES; ANIMALS; BIOLOGICAL ACCUMULATION; CARCINOGENESIS; CEREALS; EXPERIMENTAL DATA; KIDNEYS; MAMMALS; MAN; POLLUTION SOURCES; SEAFOOD; SEEDS; TOXICITY; TRACE AMOUNTS; VEGETABLES; BODY; DATA; DISTRIBUTION; ELEMENTS; FISH PRODUCTS; FOOD; GRASS; INFORMATION; NUMERICAL DATA; ORGANS; PATHOGENESIS; PLANTS; PRIMATES; SEMIMETALS; TISSUES; VERTEBRATES; 560305* - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology- Vertebrates- (-1987)

Citation Formats

Schroeder, H.A., Frost, D.V., and Balassa, J.J. Essential trace metals in man: selenium. United States: N. p., 1970. Web. doi:10.1016/0021-9681(70)90003-2.
Schroeder, H.A., Frost, D.V., & Balassa, J.J. Essential trace metals in man: selenium. United States. doi:10.1016/0021-9681(70)90003-2.
Schroeder, H.A., Frost, D.V., and Balassa, J.J. Thu . "Essential trace metals in man: selenium". United States. doi:10.1016/0021-9681(70)90003-2.
@article{osti_6424964,
title = {Essential trace metals in man: selenium},
author = {Schroeder, H.A. and Frost, D.V. and Balassa, J.J.},
abstractNote = {In order to obtain data on environmental sources and human exposures to selenium, a trace element essential for mammals, a number of common foods, wild and domestic animal tissues and tissues of human beings were analyzed by a photofluorometric technique. Selenium was found in few vegetables, but seafood, meats and most grains contained appreciable amounts. The daily intake in a standard diet was 62..mu..g. Cooked and processed foods contained considerably less selenium than raw foods. The calculated human body burden of selenium was 14.6 mg (range 13-20 mg). Wild animals contained two to three times as high a concentration of selenium as the human beings analyzed. Kidneys showed the highest concentrations. Selenium did not accumulate in human hair with age, but increased in hair of rats fed selenate. Under some conditions, selenium is carcinogenic in rats. No recorded case of human or animal cancer is known which could be attributed to environmental selenium, or the lack of it.},
doi = {10.1016/0021-9681(70)90003-2},
journal = {J. Chronic Dis.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 23,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1970},
month = {Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1970}
}