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Title: Revised Hazard Ranking System (HRS): Final rule

Abstract

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has revised the Hazard Ranking System (HRS) in response to the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA). The HRS is the scoring system EPA uses to assess the relative threat associated with the release or potential release of hazardous substances from a waste site. The HRS score is the primary criterion EPA uses to determine whether a site should be placed on the National Priorities List (NPL). The NPL identifies sites that warrant further investigation to determine if they pose risks to public health or the environment. Sites on the NPL are eligible for long-term remedial action financed under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), as amended by SARA. The revised HRS retains the same cutoff score and basic approach as the original HRS, while incorporating SARA requirements as well as improvements identified as necessary by EPA and the public. The revised HRS retains the ground water, surface water, and air pathways drops the direct contact and fire/explosion pathways, and adds a forth pathway, soil exposure.

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (USA). Office of Emergency and Remedial Response
OSTI Identifier:
6418113
Report Number(s):
PB-91-100800/XAB
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; HAZARDOUS MATERIALS; WASTE MANAGEMENT; SUPERFUND; COMPLIANCE; AIR POLLUTION; ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURE PATHWAY; LAND POLLUTION; REMEDIAL ACTION; RISK ASSESSMENT; US EPA; WATER POLLUTION; LAWS; MANAGEMENT; MATERIALS; NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS; POLLUTION; POLLUTION LAWS; US ORGANIZATIONS 540120* -- Environment, Atmospheric-- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport-- (1990-); 540220 -- Environment, Terrestrial-- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport-- (1990-); 540320 -- Environment, Aquatic-- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport-- (1990-); 290300 -- Energy Planning & Policy-- Environment, Health, & Safety

Citation Formats

Not Available. Revised Hazard Ranking System (HRS): Final rule. United States: N. p., 1990. Web.
Not Available. Revised Hazard Ranking System (HRS): Final rule. United States.
Not Available. 1990. "Revised Hazard Ranking System (HRS): Final rule". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6418113,
title = {Revised Hazard Ranking System (HRS): Final rule},
author = {Not Available},
abstractNote = {The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has revised the Hazard Ranking System (HRS) in response to the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA). The HRS is the scoring system EPA uses to assess the relative threat associated with the release or potential release of hazardous substances from a waste site. The HRS score is the primary criterion EPA uses to determine whether a site should be placed on the National Priorities List (NPL). The NPL identifies sites that warrant further investigation to determine if they pose risks to public health or the environment. Sites on the NPL are eligible for long-term remedial action financed under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), as amended by SARA. The revised HRS retains the same cutoff score and basic approach as the original HRS, while incorporating SARA requirements as well as improvements identified as necessary by EPA and the public. The revised HRS retains the ground water, surface water, and air pathways drops the direct contact and fire/explosion pathways, and adds a forth pathway, soil exposure.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1990,
month =
}

Technical Report:
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  • The Fact Sheet discusses the revised HRS which retains the same cutoff score and basic approach as the original HRS, while incorporating SARA requirements as well as improvements identified as necessary by EPA and the public. The revised HRS retains the ground water, surface water, and air pathways, drops the direct contact and fire/explosion pathways, and adds a fourth pathway, soil exposure. Several key provisions of the revised HRS make it more comprehensive. Other provisions make the revised HRS more accurate. The complexity and scope of the issues involved in revising the HRS required EPA to get widespread input. Themore » majority of the commenters believed that the revised HRS represented an improvement over the original HRS. The result is a revised HRS that is a practical and effective tool in identifying the nation's worst hazardous waste sites.« less
  • The Fact Sheet discusses U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) revised Hazard Ranking System (HRS) in response to the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA). These revised HRS Qs and As address the SARA requirements for the revised HRS, specific revisions to the HRS, the impact of the revised HRS on the site assessment and remedial processes, and selection of the cutoff score.
  • The Fact Sheet discusses the Hazard Ranking System (HRS) in response to the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA). The HRS is the scoring system EPA uses to assess the relative threat associated with the release or potential release of hazardous substances from a waste site. The HRS score is the primary criterion EPA uses to determine whether a site should be placed on the National Priorities List (NPL). The NPL identifies sites that warrant further investigation to determine if they pose risks to public health or the environment. Sites on the NPL are eligible for long-term 'remedialmore » action' financed under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), as amended by SARA. SARA authorizes a 'Hazardous Substances Superfund' totalling $8.5 billion over 5 years to pay costs not assumed by those responsible for problems at a site. The HRS uses data that can be collected relatively quickly and inexpensively, thus allowing most Superfund resources to be directed to remedial actions at sites on the NPL.« less
  • The mHRS/HRS software package was developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under contract with the Department of Energy (DOE) to provide a uniform method for DOE facilities to use in performing their Conservation Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Phase I Modified Hazard Ranking System or Hazard Ranking System evaluations. The program is designed to remove the tedium and potential for error associated with the performing of hand calculations and the interpreting of information on tables and in reference books when performing an evaluation. The software package is designed to operate on a microcomputer (IBM PC, PC/XT, ormore » PC/AT, or a compatible system) using either a dual floppy disk drive or a hard disk storage system. It is written in the dBASE III language and operates using the dBASE III system. Although the mHRS/HRS software package was developed for use at DOE facilities, it has direct applicability to the performing of CERCLA Phase I evaluations for any facility contaminated by hazardous waste. The software can perform evaluations using either the modified hazard ranking system methodology developed by DOE/PNL, the hazard ranking system methodology developed by EPA/MITRE Corp., or a combination of the two. This document is a companion manual to the mHRS/HRS user manual. It is intended for the programmer who must maintain the software package and for those interested in the computer implementation. This manual documents the system logic, computer programs, and data files that comprise the package. Hardware and software implementation requirements are discussed. In addition, hand calculations of three sample situations (problems) with associated computer runs used for the verification of program calculations are included.« less
  • The Hazard Ranking System Guidance Manual provides general and technical guidance for individuals involved in determining Hazard Ranking System (HRS) scores and preparing HRS scoring packages. The manual clarifies terms and concepts in the HRS, presents strategies and specific guidance for scoring selected HRS factors, and provides guidelines to assist in collecting and organizing relevant data.