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Title: Simulated Impact of Roof Solar Absorptance, Attic, and DuctInsulation, and Climate on Cooling and Heating Energy Use inSingle-Family Resi dential Buildings

Abstract

This report summarizes a comparative analysis of the impact of roof surface solar absorptance, attic, and duct insulation on simulated residential annual cooling and heating energy use in sixteen sunbelt climates. These locations cover a wide range of climates where cool roofs are expected to save energy and money, and are areas with high growth rates in new residential construction. The residences are single-story, single-family of new construction with either a gas furnace or an electric heat pump, and with ducts in the attic OT conditioned zone. The objective is to demonstrate that a residence with a cool roof could utilize a lower level of attic insulation than one with a dark roof with a zero net change in the annual energy bill. Annual energy use is simulated with DOE-2. lE, which was adapted with a validated residential duct-attic function, for dark and cool roofs and eleven attic insulation R-values ranging from 1 through 60. Analysis of the simulated energy savings from the light-colored roofs show that the savings can be transformed into an equivalent reduction in the level of attic insulation. Reductions in R-value are observed in varying degrees for residences with both gas and electric heat, all ductmore » configurations, and all climates. In some cooling dominated climates there are cases where a cool roof could be implemented without attic insulation.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USEPA
OSTI Identifier:
6410
Report Number(s):
LBNL-41834
ON: DE00006410
DOE Contract Number:  
AC03-76SF00098
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; Houses; Roofs; Attics; Ducts; Thermal Insulation; Absorption; Space HVAC Systems; Energy Consumption

Citation Formats

Akbari, H., and Konopacki, S. Simulated Impact of Roof Solar Absorptance, Attic, and DuctInsulation, and Climate on Cooling and Heating Energy Use inSingle-Family Resi dential Buildings. United States: N. p., 1998. Web. doi:10.2172/6410.
Akbari, H., & Konopacki, S. Simulated Impact of Roof Solar Absorptance, Attic, and DuctInsulation, and Climate on Cooling and Heating Energy Use inSingle-Family Resi dential Buildings. United States. doi:10.2172/6410.
Akbari, H., and Konopacki, S. Mon . "Simulated Impact of Roof Solar Absorptance, Attic, and DuctInsulation, and Climate on Cooling and Heating Energy Use inSingle-Family Resi dential Buildings". United States. doi:10.2172/6410. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/6410.
@article{osti_6410,
title = {Simulated Impact of Roof Solar Absorptance, Attic, and DuctInsulation, and Climate on Cooling and Heating Energy Use inSingle-Family Resi dential Buildings},
author = {Akbari, H. and Konopacki, S.},
abstractNote = {This report summarizes a comparative analysis of the impact of roof surface solar absorptance, attic, and duct insulation on simulated residential annual cooling and heating energy use in sixteen sunbelt climates. These locations cover a wide range of climates where cool roofs are expected to save energy and money, and are areas with high growth rates in new residential construction. The residences are single-story, single-family of new construction with either a gas furnace or an electric heat pump, and with ducts in the attic OT conditioned zone. The objective is to demonstrate that a residence with a cool roof could utilize a lower level of attic insulation than one with a dark roof with a zero net change in the annual energy bill. Annual energy use is simulated with DOE-2. lE, which was adapted with a validated residential duct-attic function, for dark and cool roofs and eleven attic insulation R-values ranging from 1 through 60. Analysis of the simulated energy savings from the light-colored roofs show that the savings can be transformed into an equivalent reduction in the level of attic insulation. Reductions in R-value are observed in varying degrees for residences with both gas and electric heat, all duct configurations, and all climates. In some cooling dominated climates there are cases where a cool roof could be implemented without attic insulation.},
doi = {10.2172/6410},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1998},
month = {10}
}

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