skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Developments in British environmental law

Abstract

Decisions on whether or not to build nuclear power plants are increasingly settled in the courts because of conflicting interests in the growth of electric power demand and environmental protection that has led to a breakdown in public order. Lawyers share the same sense of bewilderment as lay people over nuclear as well as noise, smoke, and other types of environmental questions. The author reviews British criminal and civil law to see how the courts have dealt with pollution issues in the past. Public inquiry over a proposed development has triggered many of Britain's major law and environment problems, the Windscale inquiry being a notable example. A reluctance to legislate is an underlying factor in the trend toward inquiry and litigation. 139 references.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Cambridge Univ., England
OSTI Identifier:
6407658
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 6407658
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Nat. Resour. J.; (United States); Journal Volume: 24:3
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY; CASE LAW; NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS; INTERVENORS; UNITED KINGDOM; LAWSUITS; LEGAL ASPECTS; POLLUTION LAWS; PUBLIC OPINION; EUROPE; GOVERNMENT POLICIES; LAWS; NUCLEAR FACILITIES; POWER PLANTS; THERMAL POWER PLANTS; WESTERN EUROPE 290300* -- Energy Planning & Policy-- Environment, Health, & Safety

Citation Formats

Williams, D.G.T. Developments in British environmental law. United States: N. p., 1984. Web.
Williams, D.G.T. Developments in British environmental law. United States.
Williams, D.G.T. Sun . "Developments in British environmental law". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6407658,
title = {Developments in British environmental law},
author = {Williams, D.G.T.},
abstractNote = {Decisions on whether or not to build nuclear power plants are increasingly settled in the courts because of conflicting interests in the growth of electric power demand and environmental protection that has led to a breakdown in public order. Lawyers share the same sense of bewilderment as lay people over nuclear as well as noise, smoke, and other types of environmental questions. The author reviews British criminal and civil law to see how the courts have dealt with pollution issues in the past. Public inquiry over a proposed development has triggered many of Britain's major law and environment problems, the Windscale inquiry being a notable example. A reluctance to legislate is an underlying factor in the trend toward inquiry and litigation. 139 references.},
doi = {},
journal = {Nat. Resour. J.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 24:3,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 1984},
month = {Sun Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 1984}
}
  • This article describes recent developments in environmental law including the following: in Toxic tort issues: standards for expert testimony; punitive damages; preemption; failure to warn and strict liability; the unavoidably unsafe defense; in Hazardous waste issues: joint and several liability; petroleum exclusion; recoverable costs; causation; owner or operator and successor liability; contribution; commerce; RCRA land bar; criminal conviction.
  • British Gas (BG) is a seriously successful monopolist which, since its 1986 privatisation, is acing increased regulation by the Office of Gas Supply (OFGAS). OFGAS is the first public body specifically created to regulate a European gas industry. It employs a rate-capping formula instead of the more labour intensive rate-of-retum method favoured in North America. Despite initial criticisms, OFGAS has surprised industry observers with efficacious results. This article succinctly discusses the process of natural gas industry privatisation in the United Kingdom (U.K.) and the development of a British type of [open quotes]open access.[close quotes] Contemporary British gas regulation is amore » distinct paradigm involving the privatisation of a vertically integrated pipeline system coupled with an altemative regulatory method. These regulatory results include lower prices for core customers and the promotion of third party direct sales within the U.K. Since Britain leads the European Community (E.C.) in common carriage provisions, the regulatory r6gime here provides a benchmark for the other Member States.« less