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Title: Effects of wind shear and turbulence on wind turbine power curves

Abstract

It is a common practice to use wind speeds at hub height in determining wind turbine power curves. Although the possible influence of other variables (sub as turbulence and wind shear) is generally neglected in power curve measurements, we discovered the importance of other variables in an analysis of power curves for three 2.5 MW wind turbines. When the power curves were stratified by turbulence intensity. Such a large sensitivity to turbulence was not expected, and further analyses were conducted to determine if other factors accompanying the change in turbulence level could cause or contribute to the observed sensitivity of the power curves to turbulence. In summary, the sensitivity of the observed power curves was largely due to two factors: (1) an actual sensitivity to turbulence in determining the power curve and (2) the deviation of the disk-averaged velocity from the hub-height velocity under low turbulence conditions that were most prevalent at the site. An examination of the wind shear profiles over the height of the rotor disk revealed that low turbulence conditions were characterized by strong shear in the lower half of the rotor disk and weak or negative shear in the upper half. Implications of this analysis aremore » that significant errors in power curve measurements can result if the effects of wind shear and turbulence are ignored. 7 refs., 6 figs.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)
  2. USDOE, Washington, DC (USA)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)
Sponsoring Org.:
DOE/CE
OSTI Identifier:
6348447
Report Number(s):
PNL-SA-18354; CONF-900989-2
ON: DE91004072
DOE Contract Number:  
AC06-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: European community wind energy conference and exhibition, Madrid (Spain), 10-14 Sep 1990
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
17 WIND ENERGY; WIND TURBINES; WIND LOADS; MEASURING METHODS; SHEAR; SITE CHARACTERIZATION; TURBULENCE; WIND POWER; DYNAMIC LOADS; ENERGY SOURCES; MACHINERY; POWER; RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES; TURBINES; TURBOMACHINERY; 170602* - Wind Energy Engineering- Turbine Design & Operation; 170604 - Wind Energy Engineering- Site Characteristics

Citation Formats

Elliott, D L, and Cadogan, J B. Effects of wind shear and turbulence on wind turbine power curves. United States: N. p., 1990. Web.
Elliott, D L, & Cadogan, J B. Effects of wind shear and turbulence on wind turbine power curves. United States.
Elliott, D L, and Cadogan, J B. Sat . "Effects of wind shear and turbulence on wind turbine power curves". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/6348447.
@article{osti_6348447,
title = {Effects of wind shear and turbulence on wind turbine power curves},
author = {Elliott, D L and Cadogan, J B},
abstractNote = {It is a common practice to use wind speeds at hub height in determining wind turbine power curves. Although the possible influence of other variables (sub as turbulence and wind shear) is generally neglected in power curve measurements, we discovered the importance of other variables in an analysis of power curves for three 2.5 MW wind turbines. When the power curves were stratified by turbulence intensity. Such a large sensitivity to turbulence was not expected, and further analyses were conducted to determine if other factors accompanying the change in turbulence level could cause or contribute to the observed sensitivity of the power curves to turbulence. In summary, the sensitivity of the observed power curves was largely due to two factors: (1) an actual sensitivity to turbulence in determining the power curve and (2) the deviation of the disk-averaged velocity from the hub-height velocity under low turbulence conditions that were most prevalent at the site. An examination of the wind shear profiles over the height of the rotor disk revealed that low turbulence conditions were characterized by strong shear in the lower half of the rotor disk and weak or negative shear in the upper half. Implications of this analysis are that significant errors in power curve measurements can result if the effects of wind shear and turbulence are ignored. 7 refs., 6 figs.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1990},
month = {9}
}

Conference:
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