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Title: Method for estimating materials fluxes from coastal wetlands into the Great Lakes, with an example from lake Erie. Technical bulletin

Abstract

A method is presented in detail for the quantitative estimation of the flux of water and dissolved or suspended materials through coastal wetlands of the Great Lakes where the juncture of the wetland and lake is constricted by a narrow opening. Application of the method requires frequent (e.g., hourly or daily) data on atmospheric deposition, precipitation, evaporation, upstream discharges from tributaries, wetland water level changes, and water chemistry data at upstream and downstream locations, as well as a detailed knowledge of wetland depth-area and depth-volume relationships. Data collected during October 1989 are used to demonstrate the method.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Sea Grant Program
OSTI Identifier:
6334467
Report Number(s):
PB-93-189876/XAB; OHSU-TB--025-93
CNN: NA89AA-D-SG132
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; LAKE ERIE; WATER POLLUTION CONTROL; SEDIMENTS; ENVIRONMENTAL TRANSPORT; WETLANDS; AGRICULTURAL WASTES; ATMOSPHERIC CIRCULATION; BUFFERS; COASTAL REGIONS; DECOMPOSITION; DEPOSITION; DEPTH; EVAPORATION; FORECASTING; GREAT LAKES; GROUND WATER; LAKES; MARSHES; MATERIALS; METEOROLOGY; OHIO; PRECIPITATION; QUANTIZATION; RUNOFF; WATER CHEMISTRY; AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; CHEMISTRY; CONTROL; DEVELOPED COUNTRIES; DIMENSIONS; ECOSYSTEMS; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; MASS TRANSFER; NORTH AMERICA; ORGANIC WASTES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; PHASE TRANSFORMATIONS; POLLUTION CONTROL; SEPARATION PROCESSES; SURFACE WATERS; USA; WASTES; WATER 540350* -- Environment, Aquatic-- Site Resource & Use Studies-- (1990-)

Citation Formats

Krieger, K.A. Method for estimating materials fluxes from coastal wetlands into the Great Lakes, with an example from lake Erie. Technical bulletin. United States: N. p., 1993. Web.
Krieger, K.A. Method for estimating materials fluxes from coastal wetlands into the Great Lakes, with an example from lake Erie. Technical bulletin. United States.
Krieger, K.A. 1993. "Method for estimating materials fluxes from coastal wetlands into the Great Lakes, with an example from lake Erie. Technical bulletin". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6334467,
title = {Method for estimating materials fluxes from coastal wetlands into the Great Lakes, with an example from lake Erie. Technical bulletin},
author = {Krieger, K.A.},
abstractNote = {A method is presented in detail for the quantitative estimation of the flux of water and dissolved or suspended materials through coastal wetlands of the Great Lakes where the juncture of the wetland and lake is constricted by a narrow opening. Application of the method requires frequent (e.g., hourly or daily) data on atmospheric deposition, precipitation, evaporation, upstream discharges from tributaries, wetland water level changes, and water chemistry data at upstream and downstream locations, as well as a detailed knowledge of wetland depth-area and depth-volume relationships. Data collected during October 1989 are used to demonstrate the method.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1993,
month = 1
}

Technical Report:
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