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Title: Compact Reversed-Field Pinch Reactors (CRFPR): preliminary engineering considerations

Abstract

The unique confinement physics of the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) projects to a compact, high-power-density fusion reactor that promises a significant reduction in the cost of electricity. The compact reactor also promises a factor-of-two reduction in the fraction of total cost devoted to the reactor plant equipment (i.e., fusion power core (FPC) plus support systems). In addition to operational and developmental benefits, these physically smaller systems can operate economically over a range of total power output. After giving an extended background and rationale for the compact fusion approaches, key FPC subsystems for the Compact RFP Reactor (CRFPR) are developed, designed, and integrated for a minimum-cost, 1000-MWe(net) system. Both the problems and promise of the compact, high-power-density fusion reactor are quantitatively evaluated on the basis of this conceptual design. The material presented in this report both forms a framework for a broader, more expanded conceptual design as well as suggests directions and emphases for related research and development.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6332214
Report Number(s):
LA-10200-MS
ON: DE85002351
DOE Contract Number:  
W-7405-ENG-36
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Portions are illegible in microfiche products. Original copy available until stock is exhausted
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; COMPACT TORUS; DESIGN; REVERSE-FIELD PINCH; BREEDING BLANKETS; COST; ECONOMIC ANALYSIS; ENERGY BALANCE; ENGINEERING; FIRST WALL; MAGNET COILS; NEUTRON TRANSPORT; OPTIMIZATION; SHIELDING; CLOSED PLASMA DEVICES; ECONOMICS; ELECTRIC COILS; ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT; EQUIPMENT; NEUTRAL-PARTICLE TRANSPORT; PINCH EFFECT; RADIATION TRANSPORT; REACTOR COMPONENTS; THERMONUCLEAR DEVICES; THERMONUCLEAR REACTOR WALLS; TORI; 700200* - Fusion Energy- Fusion Power Plant Technology

Citation Formats

Hagenson, R L, Krakowski, R A, Bathke, C G, Miller, R L, Embrechts, M J, Schnurr, N M, Battat, M E, LaBauve, R J, and Davidson, J W. Compact Reversed-Field Pinch Reactors (CRFPR): preliminary engineering considerations. United States: N. p., 1984. Web. doi:10.2172/6332214.
Hagenson, R L, Krakowski, R A, Bathke, C G, Miller, R L, Embrechts, M J, Schnurr, N M, Battat, M E, LaBauve, R J, & Davidson, J W. Compact Reversed-Field Pinch Reactors (CRFPR): preliminary engineering considerations. United States. doi:10.2172/6332214.
Hagenson, R L, Krakowski, R A, Bathke, C G, Miller, R L, Embrechts, M J, Schnurr, N M, Battat, M E, LaBauve, R J, and Davidson, J W. Wed . "Compact Reversed-Field Pinch Reactors (CRFPR): preliminary engineering considerations". United States. doi:10.2172/6332214. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/6332214.
@article{osti_6332214,
title = {Compact Reversed-Field Pinch Reactors (CRFPR): preliminary engineering considerations},
author = {Hagenson, R L and Krakowski, R A and Bathke, C G and Miller, R L and Embrechts, M J and Schnurr, N M and Battat, M E and LaBauve, R J and Davidson, J W},
abstractNote = {The unique confinement physics of the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) projects to a compact, high-power-density fusion reactor that promises a significant reduction in the cost of electricity. The compact reactor also promises a factor-of-two reduction in the fraction of total cost devoted to the reactor plant equipment (i.e., fusion power core (FPC) plus support systems). In addition to operational and developmental benefits, these physically smaller systems can operate economically over a range of total power output. After giving an extended background and rationale for the compact fusion approaches, key FPC subsystems for the Compact RFP Reactor (CRFPR) are developed, designed, and integrated for a minimum-cost, 1000-MWe(net) system. Both the problems and promise of the compact, high-power-density fusion reactor are quantitatively evaluated on the basis of this conceptual design. The material presented in this report both forms a framework for a broader, more expanded conceptual design as well as suggests directions and emphases for related research and development.},
doi = {10.2172/6332214},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1984},
month = {8}
}