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Title: From sword to chrysanthemum: Japan's culture of anti-miltarism

Abstract

The end of the Cold War and the phenomenal increase in Japan's economic and technological power put Japan today in the position to become, if it chooses, a military as well as economic superpower. The diminution of the Soviet threat and the increasing US preoccupation with domestic problems give Japan a latitude for independent action it has not had since the end of World War II. At the same time the US-Japanese security alliance, which has enabled Japan to adopt a minimalist approach to defense and national security, is being weakened by ideologically charged trade and other economic frictions and a growing American perception of Japan as a threat to its interests. Moreover, in the long run Japan faces the prospect of having to deal with other rising regional powers, most notably the People's Republic of China. This changing international security environment thus raises question whether Japan, having become an economic rival of the United States, may not in the future become a military competitor as well; whether, after having adopted a pacifist stance for half a century, Japan may choose to unsheathe its sword once again.

Authors:
OSTI Identifier:
6328659
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
International Security; (United States)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 17:4; Journal ID: ISSN 0162-2889
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
98 NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT, SAFEGUARDS, AND PHYSICAL PROTECTION; JAPAN; ECONOMIC POLICY; FOREIGN POLICY; ARMS CONTROL; CHINA; NATIONAL DEFENSE; NATIONAL SECURITY; USA; ASIA; DEVELOPED COUNTRIES; GOVERNMENT POLICIES; NORTH AMERICA; SECURITY; 350100* - Arms Control- Policy, Negotiations, & Legislation- (1987-)

Citation Formats

Berger, T.U. From sword to chrysanthemum: Japan's culture of anti-miltarism. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.2307/2539024.
Berger, T.U. From sword to chrysanthemum: Japan's culture of anti-miltarism. United States. doi:10.2307/2539024.
Berger, T.U. . "From sword to chrysanthemum: Japan's culture of anti-miltarism". United States. doi:10.2307/2539024.
@article{osti_6328659,
title = {From sword to chrysanthemum: Japan's culture of anti-miltarism},
author = {Berger, T.U.},
abstractNote = {The end of the Cold War and the phenomenal increase in Japan's economic and technological power put Japan today in the position to become, if it chooses, a military as well as economic superpower. The diminution of the Soviet threat and the increasing US preoccupation with domestic problems give Japan a latitude for independent action it has not had since the end of World War II. At the same time the US-Japanese security alliance, which has enabled Japan to adopt a minimalist approach to defense and national security, is being weakened by ideologically charged trade and other economic frictions and a growing American perception of Japan as a threat to its interests. Moreover, in the long run Japan faces the prospect of having to deal with other rising regional powers, most notably the People's Republic of China. This changing international security environment thus raises question whether Japan, having become an economic rival of the United States, may not in the future become a military competitor as well; whether, after having adopted a pacifist stance for half a century, Japan may choose to unsheathe its sword once again.},
doi = {10.2307/2539024},
journal = {International Security; (United States)},
issn = {0162-2889},
number = ,
volume = 17:4,
place = {United States},
year = {},
month = {}
}