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Title: Geothermal Exploratory-Well Project: city of Alamosa, Colorado. Final report, September 1980-April 1983

Abstract

The Geothermal Exploratory Well Project for the City of Alamosa, Colorado is summarized. In September, 1980, the City of Alamosa made application to the US Department of Energy for a program which, in essence, provided for the Department of Energy to insure that the City would not risk more than 10% of the total cost in the well if the well was a failure. If the well was a complete success, such as 650 gpm and 230/sup 0/F temperature, the City was responsible for 80% of the costs for drilling the well and there would be no further obligation from the Department of Energy. The well was drilled in November and early December, 1981, and remedial work was done in May and June 1982. The total drilled depth was 7118 ft. The well was cased to 4182 ft., with a slotted liner to 6084 ft. The maximum down hole temperature recorded was 190/sup 0/F at 6294 ft. Testing immediately following the remedial work indicated the well had virtually no potential to produce water.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Energy Services, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6322238
Report Number(s):
DOE/ID/12259-T1
ON: DE83012492
DOE Contract Number:
FC07-81ID12259
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Portions are illegible in microfiche products
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; GEOTHERMAL WELLS; TESTING; WELL DRILLING; EXPLORATORY WELLS; FAILURES; FLOW RATE; WELL CASINGS; WELL TEMPERATURE; DRILLING; RESERVOIR TEMPERATURE; WELLS; Geothermal Legacy; 150303* - Geothermal Exploration & Exploration Technology- Exploratory Drilling & Well Logging

Citation Formats

Phetteplace, D.R., and Kunze, J.F.. Geothermal Exploratory-Well Project: city of Alamosa, Colorado. Final report, September 1980-April 1983. United States: N. p., 1983. Web. doi:10.2172/6322238.
Phetteplace, D.R., & Kunze, J.F.. Geothermal Exploratory-Well Project: city of Alamosa, Colorado. Final report, September 1980-April 1983. United States. doi:10.2172/6322238.
Phetteplace, D.R., and Kunze, J.F.. 1983. "Geothermal Exploratory-Well Project: city of Alamosa, Colorado. Final report, September 1980-April 1983". United States. doi:10.2172/6322238. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/6322238.
@article{osti_6322238,
title = {Geothermal Exploratory-Well Project: city of Alamosa, Colorado. Final report, September 1980-April 1983},
author = {Phetteplace, D.R. and Kunze, J.F.},
abstractNote = {The Geothermal Exploratory Well Project for the City of Alamosa, Colorado is summarized. In September, 1980, the City of Alamosa made application to the US Department of Energy for a program which, in essence, provided for the Department of Energy to insure that the City would not risk more than 10% of the total cost in the well if the well was a failure. If the well was a complete success, such as 650 gpm and 230/sup 0/F temperature, the City was responsible for 80% of the costs for drilling the well and there would be no further obligation from the Department of Energy. The well was drilled in November and early December, 1981, and remedial work was done in May and June 1982. The total drilled depth was 7118 ft. The well was cased to 4182 ft., with a slotted liner to 6084 ft. The maximum down hole temperature recorded was 190/sup 0/F at 6294 ft. Testing immediately following the remedial work indicated the well had virtually no potential to produce water.},
doi = {10.2172/6322238},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1983,
month = 1
}

Technical Report:

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  • A 7118 ft (2170 m) deep geothermal test well was drilled on the south edge of the city of Alamosa, Colorado as part of the Department of Energy's User Coupled Confirmation Drilling Program. The project was selected on the bases of a potential direct heat geothermal resource within the Rio Grande rift graben and resource users in Alamosa. The well site was selected on the hypothesis of a buried horst along which deep thermal fluids might be rising. In addition, there were city wells that were anomalous in temperature and the location was convenient to potential application. The Alamosa No.more » 1 penetrated 2000 ft (610 m) of fine clastic rocks over 4000 ft (1219 m) of volcaniclastic rock resting on precambrian crystalline rock at a depth of 6370 ft (1942 m). Due to poor hole conditions, geophysical logs were not run. The stabilized bottom hole temperature was 223/sup 0/F (106/sup 0/C) with a gradient of 2.6/sup 0/F/100 ft (47/sup 0/C/km). Limited testing indicated a very low production capacity. 16 refs., 6 figs.« less
  • The behavior of geopressured reservoirs was investigated by drilling and producing a well in small, well defined, geopressured reservoir; and performing detailed pressure transient analysis together with geological, geophysical, chemical, and physical studies. The Dow-DOE L. R. Sweezy No. 1 well was drilled to a depth of 13,600 feet in Parcperdue field, just south of Lafayette, Louisiana, and began production in April, 1982. The production zone was a poorly consolidated sandstone which constantly produced sand into the well stream, causing damage to equipment and causing other problems. The amount of sand production was kept manageable by limiting the flow ratemore » to below 10,000 barrels per day. Reservoir properties of size, thickness, depth, temperature, pressure, salinity, porosity, and permeability were close to predicted values. The reservoir brine was undersaturated with respect to gas, containing approximately 20 standard cubic feet of gas per barrel of brine. Shale dewatering either did not occur or was insignificant as a drive mechanism. Production terminated when the gravel-pack completion failed and the production well totally sanded in, February, 1983. Total production up to the sanding incident was 1.94 million barrels brine and 31.5 million standard cubic feet gas.« less
  • This report presents the results of a detailed microearthquake survey of the geothermal area at Long Valley, California. High quality digital data from a dense 3-component array covering a three-month period during the summer of 1981 have been processed for locations, velocity structure, magnitudes, focal mechanisms, and source parameters. Hypocenter locations determined from this array have estimated errors of 0.5 km in epicenter and 1.0 km in depth relative to one another. Detailed hypocentral locations show two complex zones of seismicity beneath the south moat of the caldera which seems associated with the major hot spring activity within the calderamore » and could be part of the conduit system feeding hydrothermal waters to these hot springs. Seismic activity at Long Valley appears to be influenced by both regional tectonic stresses and local volcanotectonic activity.« less
  • For acceptor-type compounds (p-type synthetic metals), the highest conductivity coincides with a charge density approx. 0.05q/C, where q is the elementary charge. Thus the optimum ionic salt conductor is C/sub 20//sup +/ A/sup -/B/sup 0/, where A/sup -/ are the counterions and B/sup 0/ are neutral molecules. At higher charge density, the ionic salt picture breaks down, as evidenced by C-O or C-F covalent bond formation (revealed by ESCA). These bonds act as scattering defects, reducing sigma/sub a/(300K). Further, the sigma/sub a/(T) behavior is defect-dominated up to 300K and perhaps beyond, and the reflectivity edges broaden accordingly. Given the intrinsicmore » properties of the 2D graphite net and the dominance of graphite-derived phonons at 300K, it is concluded that all acceptor GIC's will have the same limiting conductivity 1/3 to 1/2 that of pure copper at 300K.« less
  • Based on discussions with the City of North Bonneville, the production test well was drilled to a depth that would also explore for ground water temperatures near 130/sup 0/F (54.4/sup 0/C). Depth projections to a 130/sup 0/F bottom hole temperature were made by assuming a constant ground water temperature rise greater than 50/sup 0/C per kilometer, and by assuming that essentially homogeneous or equivalent conductive rock units would be encountered. Minimum water production requirements were not set, although the City determined that about 800 gpm would be acceptable. Large upper casing diameters of 16 and 12 inches were installed inmore » order to provide the future use of either a vertical turbine or submersible pump, as desired by the city. The scope of work included interpretation of well characteristics, evaluation of ground water as a geothermal resource, geologic analysis of data from drilling and testing, drilling supervision, daily drilling cost accounting, and preparation of a final report. The report includes geologic evaluation of the drilling and test data, ground water and geothermal potential.« less