skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: A fully omnidirectional wheeled assembly for robotic vehicles

Abstract

A large number of wheeled or tracked platform mechanisms have been studied and developed to provide their mobility capability to teleoperated and autonomous robot vehicles. This paper presents an original wheeled platform based on an orthogonal wheel assembly that provides a full (three-degrees-of-freedom) omnidirectionality of the platform without wheel slippage and with the capability for simultaneous motions in rotation and translation (including sideways movements). A schematic of the basic wheel assembly is shown. The motion of the assembly is unconstrained (freewheeling) in the direction parallel to the main assembly shaft, while it is constrained in the direction perpendicular to the shaft, being driven in this direction by rotation of the shaft. A prototype platform was constructed to demonstrate the feasibility of this new concept.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6268996
Report Number(s):
CONF-900608-
Journal ID: ISSN 0003-018X; CODEN: TANSA; TRN: 91-009323
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Transactions of the American Nuclear Society; (USA); Journal Volume: 61; Conference: American Nuclear Society (ANS) annual meeting, Nashville, TN (USA), 10-14 Jun 1990
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; ROBOTS; CONTROL SYSTEMS; WHEELS; VEHICLES; AVAILABILITY; DEGREES OF FREEDOM; GEOMETRY; MOTION; RELIABILITY; ROTATION; MATHEMATICS; 420203* - Engineering- Handling Equipment & Procedures; 990200 - Mathematics & Computers

Citation Formats

Killough, S.M., and Pin, F.G.. A fully omnidirectional wheeled assembly for robotic vehicles. United States: N. p., 1990. Web.
Killough, S.M., & Pin, F.G.. A fully omnidirectional wheeled assembly for robotic vehicles. United States.
Killough, S.M., and Pin, F.G.. Fri . "A fully omnidirectional wheeled assembly for robotic vehicles". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6268996,
title = {A fully omnidirectional wheeled assembly for robotic vehicles},
author = {Killough, S.M. and Pin, F.G.},
abstractNote = {A large number of wheeled or tracked platform mechanisms have been studied and developed to provide their mobility capability to teleoperated and autonomous robot vehicles. This paper presents an original wheeled platform based on an orthogonal wheel assembly that provides a full (three-degrees-of-freedom) omnidirectionality of the platform without wheel slippage and with the capability for simultaneous motions in rotation and translation (including sideways movements). A schematic of the basic wheel assembly is shown. The motion of the assembly is unconstrained (freewheeling) in the direction parallel to the main assembly shaft, while it is constrained in the direction perpendicular to the shaft, being driven in this direction by rotation of the shaft. A prototype platform was constructed to demonstrate the feasibility of this new concept.},
doi = {},
journal = {Transactions of the American Nuclear Society; (USA)},
number = ,
volume = 61,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 1990},
month = {Fri Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 1990}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share:
  • Mobile robotic platforms are currently being investigated for transporting robots to various work sites and assisting robot movements at the work site. An ideal platform would be one with full 3-degree-of-freedom (DOF) movement (x,y translation and rotation) to enable tighter navigation and docking, obstacle avoidance, and improved manipulator reach. Three DOFs would also simplify control of the platform and make it more general, thus providing more opportunities for autonomous control. Such a 3-DOF platform has been developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and is being used for artificial intelligence research. Mathematical details on how these platforms are configured andmore » controlled are also discussed. 5 refs., 6 figs.« less
  • For practical robotics application in outdoors or complex environments (e.g. firefighting, warehouse management, floor cleaning, plant surveillance, emergency handling, etc.), mobile robotic platforms are needed for the transport of the manipulative or perceptive robots to various work sites and to assist robot movements at the work site. An ideal platform would be one with full 3-degree-of-freedom (DOF) movement (x, y translation and rotation) to enable tighter navigation and docking, obstacle avoidance, and improved manipulator reach. Three DOFs would also simplify control of the platform and make it more general, thus providing more opportunities for autonomous control. Such a 3-DOF platformmore » based on an orthogonal wheel assembly has been developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and is being used for robotics and artificial intelligence research. This paper presents the mathematical details of the design and control of this type of platform and discusses the experiences and lessons learned with the first prototype. Improvements on the basic wheel assembly as well as optimum platform configurations that are considered for various applications are also discussed.« less
  • This paper presents the concepts for a new family of wheeled platforms which feature full omnidirectionality with simultaneous and independent rotational and translational motion capabilities. We first describe the original orthogonal-wheels assembly'' on which these platforms are based and discuss how a combination of these assemblies is used to generate an omnidirectional capability. The design and control of a prototype platform developed to test and demonstrate the proposed concepts is then described, and experimental results illustrating the full omnidirectionality of the platform with decoupled rotational and translational degrees of freedom are presented. 15 refs., 9 figs.
  • This paper presents a set of motion planners for an exploration vehicle on a simulated rugged terrain. The vehicle has four wheels for its movement and a robotic arm mounted on the vehicle for object manipulation. Given a target point to reach with the hand of the arm, our planners first compute a path for the vehicle to the vicinity of the target, then compute an optimal vehicle position from which the arm can reach the target point, and then plans a path for the arm to reach the target. The vehicle path is planned in two stages. A roughmore » path is planned considering only global features of the terrain, and the path is modified by a local planner to avoid more detailed features of the terrain. The planners are expected to increase the autonomy of robots and improve the efficiencies of exploration missions.« less
  • This paper describes a simple algorithm to perform navigation in a two-dimensional world model. The algorithm utilizes a simple geometric approach which is first applied to a bicycle. The equations are then expanded to apply to 3- and 4-wheeled vehicles with ''conventional'' steering mechanisms (such as the Ackerman steering geometry in the 4-wheeled case). Calculations for omnidirectional robots which utilize differential odometry and differential drive are described as well. Practical considerations and sources of error are discussed, as are possible extensions of this method to a three-dimensional world model. 5 refs., 8 figs.