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Title: Assessment of national consequences of increased coal utilization. Executive summary

Abstract

In addressing the set of National Energy Plan (NEP) scenario assumptions, ten technical areas were considered: Siting, Air Quality, Western Long-Range Transport of Sulfur, Eastern Long-Range Transport of Sulfur, Water Quality, Water Availability, Solid Waste, Local Socioeconomics, National Economics, and Health Effects. The major constraints to reaching NEP coal use goals, which are 160 GWe of new utility coal use and 4.5 Quads of new industrial coal use, appear to be those pertaining to air quality. They involve the siting of utility and industrial sources in or near nonattainment areas or Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) Class I areas. Implementation of NEP initiatives should not cause increased public health impacts. The major impact on coal use will arise in areas upwind from population areas projected to be subject to high sulfate levels. Water quality and water availability constraints on site-specific bases are expected. Solid waste does not appear to be a constraint for achieving NEP coal use goals, particularly in the utility sector. It may, however, severely restrict NEP coal use goals for industry, especially in urban areas where a lack of suitable nearby solid waste disposal sites could result in high transportation costs. This factor could constrain up tomore » 40% of new industrial coal use. Total occupational health impacts increase proportionately to coal production and utilization. The major occupational health effects in the mining sector will be disease and accidents. Given the generic nature of coal use and its increased usage, the conclusions found in this report should be reasonably accurate and serve as guidelines for assisting in policy decisions; regulations based on new or recent laws should be monitored and reviewed as they are promulgated. (LTN)« less

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab., IL (USA); Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA); California Univ., Berkeley (USA). Lawrence Berkeley Lab.; Los Alamos Scientific Lab., NM (USA); Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA); Battelle Pacific Northwest Labs., Richland, WA (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6244202
Report Number(s):
TID-2945(Vol.2)
DOE Contract Number:  
W-31-109-ENG-38; EY-76-C-02-0016; W-7405-ENG-48; W-7405-ENG-36; W-7405-ENG-26; EY-76-C-06-1830
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; COAL; COMBUSTION; FOSSIL-FUEL POWER PLANTS; SITE SELECTION; INDUSTRIAL PLANTS; NATIONAL ENERGY PLAN; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; SOLID WASTES; WASTE DISPOSAL; WATER RESOURCES; AVAILABILITY; AIR POLLUTION; LEGISLATION; OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES; REGIONAL ANALYSIS; REGULATIONS; SOCIO-ECONOMIC FACTORS; SULFUR DIOXIDE; USA; WATER QUALITY; CARBONACEOUS MATERIALS; CHALCOGENIDES; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; DISEASES; ENERGY POLICY; ENERGY SOURCES; FOSSIL FUELS; FUELS; GOVERNMENT POLICIES; INSTITUTIONAL FACTORS; MANAGEMENT; NORTH AMERICA; OXIDATION; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; POLLUTION; POWER PLANTS; SULFUR COMPOUNDS; SULFUR OXIDES; THERMAL POWER PLANTS; THERMOCHEMICAL PROCESSES; WASTE MANAGEMENT; WASTES; 017000* - Coal, Lignite, & Peat- Legislation & Regulations; 294001 - Energy Planning & Policy- Coal; 293000 - Energy Planning & Policy- Policy, Legislation, & Regulation; 010900 - Coal, Lignite, & Peat- Environmental Aspects

Citation Formats

Not Available. Assessment of national consequences of increased coal utilization. Executive summary. United States: N. p., 1979. Web.
Not Available. Assessment of national consequences of increased coal utilization. Executive summary. United States.
Not Available. Thu . "Assessment of national consequences of increased coal utilization. Executive summary". United States.
@article{osti_6244202,
title = {Assessment of national consequences of increased coal utilization. Executive summary},
author = {Not Available},
abstractNote = {In addressing the set of National Energy Plan (NEP) scenario assumptions, ten technical areas were considered: Siting, Air Quality, Western Long-Range Transport of Sulfur, Eastern Long-Range Transport of Sulfur, Water Quality, Water Availability, Solid Waste, Local Socioeconomics, National Economics, and Health Effects. The major constraints to reaching NEP coal use goals, which are 160 GWe of new utility coal use and 4.5 Quads of new industrial coal use, appear to be those pertaining to air quality. They involve the siting of utility and industrial sources in or near nonattainment areas or Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) Class I areas. Implementation of NEP initiatives should not cause increased public health impacts. The major impact on coal use will arise in areas upwind from population areas projected to be subject to high sulfate levels. Water quality and water availability constraints on site-specific bases are expected. Solid waste does not appear to be a constraint for achieving NEP coal use goals, particularly in the utility sector. It may, however, severely restrict NEP coal use goals for industry, especially in urban areas where a lack of suitable nearby solid waste disposal sites could result in high transportation costs. This factor could constrain up to 40% of new industrial coal use. Total occupational health impacts increase proportionately to coal production and utilization. The major occupational health effects in the mining sector will be disease and accidents. Given the generic nature of coal use and its increased usage, the conclusions found in this report should be reasonably accurate and serve as guidelines for assisting in policy decisions; regulations based on new or recent laws should be monitored and reviewed as they are promulgated. (LTN)},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1979},
month = {2}
}

Technical Report:
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