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Title: Fatigue-crack monitoring in-flight using acoustic emission - hardware, technique, and testing

Abstract

The three programs described represent a logical evolutionary process toward effective flaw surveillance in aircraft using AE. The Macchi tests showed that an AE system can withstand extended in-flight service and collect meaningful information relative to fatigue crack growth at a single specific location. The MIrage aircraft work seeks to extend the methods demonstrated on the Macchi into a more complex circumstance. We are now attempting to detect and locate crack growth at any of twenty fastener locations in a relatively complex geometry. The DARPA pattern recognition program seeks to develop signal identification capability that would pave the way for general monitoring of aircraft structures using AE to detect fatigue crack growth. It appears that AE technology may be capable of enhancing aircraft safety assurance while reducing inspection requirements with the associated costs.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6242388
Report Number(s):
PNL-SA-9511; CONF-8109207-1
ON: DE83007573
DOE Contract Number:
AC06-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: ATA non-destructive testing forum, Phoenix, AZ, USA, 1 Sep 1981; Other Information: Portions are illegible in microfiche products
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; AIRCRAFT; ACOUSTIC EMISSION TESTING; FLIGHT TESTING; CRACKS; FATIGUE; SAFETY; ACOUSTIC TESTING; MATERIALS TESTING; MECHANICAL PROPERTIES; NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING; TESTING; 420500* - Engineering- Materials Testing

Citation Formats

Hutton, P.H., Skorpik, J.R., and Lemon, D.K. Fatigue-crack monitoring in-flight using acoustic emission - hardware, technique, and testing. United States: N. p., 1981. Web.
Hutton, P.H., Skorpik, J.R., & Lemon, D.K. Fatigue-crack monitoring in-flight using acoustic emission - hardware, technique, and testing. United States.
Hutton, P.H., Skorpik, J.R., and Lemon, D.K. 1981. "Fatigue-crack monitoring in-flight using acoustic emission - hardware, technique, and testing". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6242388,
title = {Fatigue-crack monitoring in-flight using acoustic emission - hardware, technique, and testing},
author = {Hutton, P.H. and Skorpik, J.R. and Lemon, D.K.},
abstractNote = {The three programs described represent a logical evolutionary process toward effective flaw surveillance in aircraft using AE. The Macchi tests showed that an AE system can withstand extended in-flight service and collect meaningful information relative to fatigue crack growth at a single specific location. The MIrage aircraft work seeks to extend the methods demonstrated on the Macchi into a more complex circumstance. We are now attempting to detect and locate crack growth at any of twenty fastener locations in a relatively complex geometry. The DARPA pattern recognition program seeks to develop signal identification capability that would pave the way for general monitoring of aircraft structures using AE to detect fatigue crack growth. It appears that AE technology may be capable of enhancing aircraft safety assurance while reducing inspection requirements with the associated costs.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1981,
month = 7
}

Conference:
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