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Title: Recent advances in the study of microbiologically influenced corrosion

Abstract

The study of microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) has progressed from phenomenological case histories to a mature interdisciplinary science including electrochemical, metallurgical, surface analytical, microbiological, biotechnological and biophysical techniques. With gene probes and microelectrodes it is now possible to measure interfacial dissolved oxygen, dissolved sulfide and pH and to further determine the microbial species responsible for the localized chemistry. Biofilms can be tailored to contain consortia of specific microorganisms and naturally occurring biofilms can be dissected into cellular and extracellular constituents. Scanning vibrating electrodes can be used to map the distribution of anodes and cathodes so that localized corrosion can be correlated with the location of microorganisms. The development of environmental scanning electron, atomic force, and laser confocal microscopy makes it possible to image cells on surfaces and to accurately determine the spatial relationship between microorganisms and corrosion. Transport of nutrients through biofilms is being modeled using techniques including optical density measurements to precisely locate the water/biofilm interface and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging to visualize flow characteristics near surfaces colonized with microorganisms. The ways in which these new techniques can be used to understand fundamental mechanisms and to discriminate critical issues of MIC will be discussed.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Naval Research Lab., Stennis Space Center, MS (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
62219
Report Number(s):
CONF-921101-Vol.294
TRN: 95:002922-0035
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 16. Materials Research Society (MRS) fall meeting, Boston, MA (United States), 30 Nov - 5 Dec 1992; Other Information: PBD: 1993; Related Information: Is Part Of Scientific basis for nuclear waste management XVI; Interrante, C.G. [ed.] [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)]; Pabalan, R.T. [ed.] [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)]; PB: 959 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
05 NUCLEAR FUELS; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 55 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, BASIC STUDIES; MICROORGANISMS; DETECTION; METALS; BIODEGRADATION; CORROSION; GROUND WATER; BIOCHEMISTRY; DISSOLVED GASES; SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIA

Citation Formats

Little, B., and Wagner, P.. Recent advances in the study of microbiologically influenced corrosion. United States: N. p., 1993. Web.
Little, B., & Wagner, P.. Recent advances in the study of microbiologically influenced corrosion. United States.
Little, B., and Wagner, P.. 1993. "Recent advances in the study of microbiologically influenced corrosion". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_62219,
title = {Recent advances in the study of microbiologically influenced corrosion},
author = {Little, B. and Wagner, P.},
abstractNote = {The study of microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) has progressed from phenomenological case histories to a mature interdisciplinary science including electrochemical, metallurgical, surface analytical, microbiological, biotechnological and biophysical techniques. With gene probes and microelectrodes it is now possible to measure interfacial dissolved oxygen, dissolved sulfide and pH and to further determine the microbial species responsible for the localized chemistry. Biofilms can be tailored to contain consortia of specific microorganisms and naturally occurring biofilms can be dissected into cellular and extracellular constituents. Scanning vibrating electrodes can be used to map the distribution of anodes and cathodes so that localized corrosion can be correlated with the location of microorganisms. The development of environmental scanning electron, atomic force, and laser confocal microscopy makes it possible to image cells on surfaces and to accurately determine the spatial relationship between microorganisms and corrosion. Transport of nutrients through biofilms is being modeled using techniques including optical density measurements to precisely locate the water/biofilm interface and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging to visualize flow characteristics near surfaces colonized with microorganisms. The ways in which these new techniques can be used to understand fundamental mechanisms and to discriminate critical issues of MIC will be discussed.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1993,
month =
}

Conference:
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  • The study of microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) has progressed from phenomenological case histories to a mature interdisciplinary science including electrochemical, metallurgical, surface analytical, microbiological, biotechnological and biophysical techniques. With gene probes and microelectrodes it is now possible to measure interfacial dissolved oxygen, dissolved sulfide and pH and to further determine the microbial species responsible for the localized chemistry. Biofilms can be tailored to contain consortia of specific microorganisms and naturally occurring biofilms can be dissected into cellular and extracellular constituents. Scanning vibrating electrodes can be used to map the distribution of anodes and cathodes so that localized corrosion can bemore » correlated with the location of microorganisms. The development of environmental scanning electron, atomic force, and laser confocal microscopy makes it possible to image cells on surfaces and to accurately determine the spatial relationship between microorganisms and corrosion. Transport of nutrients through biofilms is being modeled using techniques including optical density measurements to precisely locate the water/biofilm interface and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging to visualize flow characteristics near surfaces colonized with microorganisms. The way in which these now techniques can be used to understand fundamental mechanisms and to discriminate critical issues of MIC will be discussed.« less
  • A critical review of the technical literature concerned with monitoring techniques for the study of microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) is presented. MIC involves the initiation or acceleration of corrosion by microorganisms. The metabolic products of microorganisms appear to affect most engineering materials, but the more commonly used corrosion resistant alloys such as stainless steels seem to be particularly susceptible. The monitoring techniques covered in this review include measurements of electrochemical properties, measurements of physical metal loss, and enumeration of sessile organisms. This paper discusses the procedures, as well as advantages and disadvantages of each technique for the study of MIC.more » Applications range from studies of general and localized corrosion, pressure drop and heat transfer resistance to the investigation of the formation of biofilms on stainless steel weldments in freshwater as well as in seawater. In order to adequately address MIC problems, interdisciplinary cooperation of specialists in microbiology, metallurgy, corrosion and water chemistry is required. Similarly, the complexities of MIC are such that one technique generally can not provide all the answers in terms of corrosion mechanisms, however, monitoring tools may assist in avoiding costly corrosion failures. 72 refs.« less
  • Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion (MIC) is a serious problem. The establishment of a biofilm on a metal surface plays a critical role in MIC. Quaternary amines have been reported to inhibit the bacterial adhesion to the metal surface. However, most of the quaternary amines are quite toxic. In light of growing concerns of environmental impact and safety, a series of experiments was conducted to evaluate various corrosion inhibitors for their inhibition capability of bacterial adhesion as well as bacterial kill. The results indicate that some inhibitors are capable of inhibiting biofilm formation on mild steel coupons. In addition, these inhibitors havemore » biocidal properties. Initial toxicity studies suggest that some of these inhibitors are less toxic than most industrial biocides. This paper discusses the cost-effectiveness of use of these inhibitors in some systems.« less
  • The results of surveys of microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) at electric power generating stations and the author's on-site investigations have shown that MIC can be a serious problem in these facilities. Almost all systems and types of alloys were affected. The data obtained suggest that acid-producing bacteria play a significant role in MIC of carbon steel and perhaps other alloys. Two case histories of MIC in electric generating stations are presented to illustrate the MIC investigation process. The practical and theoretical aspects of MIC are discussed with a view towards minimizing the impact this problem has on the electric powermore » generating industry.« less
  • This symposium was held November 16--17, 1992 in Miami, Florida. The purpose of the symposium was to provide a forum for state-of-the-art information on the effects of microorganisms on the corrosion of metals. Many industrial needs in the area of microbial influenced corrosion testing are identified in the presentations along with latest laboratory and field testing techniques. Strategies to monitor and control corrosion and biofouling in water distribution systems, underground pipelines, buildings, and marine vessels are discussed. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.