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Title: Hydronic radiant cooling: Overview and preliminary performance assessment

Abstract

A significant amount of electrical energy used to cool non-residential buildings is drawn by the fans used to transport the cool air through the thermal distribution system. Hydronic systems reduce the amount of air transported through the building by separating ventilation and thermal conditioning. Due to the physical properties of water, hydronic distribution systems can transport a given amount of thermal energy using less than 5% of the otherwise necessary fan energy. This savings alone significantly reduces the energy consumption and especially the peak power requirement This survey clearly shows advantages for radiant cooling in combination with hydronic thermal distribution systems in comparison with the All-Air Systems commonly used in California. The report describes a literature survey on the system's development, thermal comfort issues, and cooling performance. The cooling power potential and the cooling power requirement are investigated for several California climates. Peak-power requirement is compared for hydronic radiant cooling and conventional All-Air-Systems.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; CAIEE; USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); California Inst. for Energy Efficiency, Berkeley, CA (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
6214501
Report Number(s):
LBL-33194
ON: DE93016715
DOE Contract Number:
AC03-76SF00098
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS; COOLING; ENERGY CONSUMPTION; ENERGY EFFICIENCY; RADIANT HEAT TRANSFER; VENTILATION; WATER; BUILDINGS; EFFICIENCY; ENERGY TRANSFER; HEAT TRANSFER; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; 320107* - Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization- Building Systems- (1987-)

Citation Formats

Feustel, H.E.. Hydronic radiant cooling: Overview and preliminary performance assessment. United States: N. p., 1993. Web. doi:10.2172/6214501.
Feustel, H.E.. Hydronic radiant cooling: Overview and preliminary performance assessment. United States. doi:10.2172/6214501.
Feustel, H.E.. Sat . "Hydronic radiant cooling: Overview and preliminary performance assessment". United States. doi:10.2172/6214501. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/6214501.
@article{osti_6214501,
title = {Hydronic radiant cooling: Overview and preliminary performance assessment},
author = {Feustel, H.E.},
abstractNote = {A significant amount of electrical energy used to cool non-residential buildings is drawn by the fans used to transport the cool air through the thermal distribution system. Hydronic systems reduce the amount of air transported through the building by separating ventilation and thermal conditioning. Due to the physical properties of water, hydronic distribution systems can transport a given amount of thermal energy using less than 5% of the otherwise necessary fan energy. This savings alone significantly reduces the energy consumption and especially the peak power requirement This survey clearly shows advantages for radiant cooling in combination with hydronic thermal distribution systems in comparison with the All-Air Systems commonly used in California. The report describes a literature survey on the system's development, thermal comfort issues, and cooling performance. The cooling power potential and the cooling power requirement are investigated for several California climates. Peak-power requirement is compared for hydronic radiant cooling and conventional All-Air-Systems.},
doi = {10.2172/6214501},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat May 01 00:00:00 EDT 1993},
month = {Sat May 01 00:00:00 EDT 1993}
}

Technical Report:

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