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Title: Removal of phenols from wastewater by soluble and immobilized tyrosinase

Abstract

An enzymatic method for removal of phenols from industrial wastewater was investigated. Phenols in an aqueous solution were removed after treatment with mushroom tyrosinase. The reduction order of substituted phenols is catechol > p-cresol > p-chlorophenol > phenol > p-methoxyphenol. In the treatment of tyrosinase alone, no precipitate was formed but a color change from colorless to dark-brown was observed. The colored products were removed by chitin and chitosan which are available abundantly as shellfish waste. In addition, the reduction rate of phenols was observed to be accelerated in the presence of chitosan. Tyrosinase, immobilized by using amino groups in the enzyme on cation exchange resins, can be used repeatedly. By treatment with immobilized tyrosinase, 100% of phenol was removed after 2 h, and the activity was reduced very little even after 10 repeat treatments.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. (National Inst. for Resources and Environment, Ibaraki (Japan))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6206327
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biotechnology and Bioengineering; (United States); Journal Volume: 42:7
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; PHENOLS; MATERIALS RECOVERY; TYROSINASE; ENZYME ACTIVITY; WASTE WATER; DECONTAMINATION; IMMOBILIZED ENZYMES; INDUSTRIAL WASTES; AROMATICS; CLEANING; ENZYMES; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; HYDROXY COMPOUNDS; HYDROXYLASES; LIQUID WASTES; MANAGEMENT; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; OXIDOREDUCTASES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; PROCESSING; PROTEINS; WASTE MANAGEMENT; WASTE PROCESSING; WASTES; WATER; 540320* - Environment, Aquatic- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport- (1990-); 560300 - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology

Citation Formats

Wada, Shinji, Ichikawa, Hiroyasu, and Tatsumi, Kenji. Removal of phenols from wastewater by soluble and immobilized tyrosinase. United States: N. p., 1993. Web. doi:10.1002/bit.260420710.
Wada, Shinji, Ichikawa, Hiroyasu, & Tatsumi, Kenji. Removal of phenols from wastewater by soluble and immobilized tyrosinase. United States. doi:10.1002/bit.260420710.
Wada, Shinji, Ichikawa, Hiroyasu, and Tatsumi, Kenji. Mon . "Removal of phenols from wastewater by soluble and immobilized tyrosinase". United States. doi:10.1002/bit.260420710.
@article{osti_6206327,
title = {Removal of phenols from wastewater by soluble and immobilized tyrosinase},
author = {Wada, Shinji and Ichikawa, Hiroyasu and Tatsumi, Kenji},
abstractNote = {An enzymatic method for removal of phenols from industrial wastewater was investigated. Phenols in an aqueous solution were removed after treatment with mushroom tyrosinase. The reduction order of substituted phenols is catechol > p-cresol > p-chlorophenol > phenol > p-methoxyphenol. In the treatment of tyrosinase alone, no precipitate was formed but a color change from colorless to dark-brown was observed. The colored products were removed by chitin and chitosan which are available abundantly as shellfish waste. In addition, the reduction rate of phenols was observed to be accelerated in the presence of chitosan. Tyrosinase, immobilized by using amino groups in the enzyme on cation exchange resins, can be used repeatedly. By treatment with immobilized tyrosinase, 100% of phenol was removed after 2 h, and the activity was reduced very little even after 10 repeat treatments.},
doi = {10.1002/bit.260420710},
journal = {Biotechnology and Bioengineering; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 42:7,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Sep 20 00:00:00 EDT 1993},
month = {Mon Sep 20 00:00:00 EDT 1993}
}
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