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Title: Ecology of southeastern shrub bogs (pocosins) and Carolina bays: a community profile

Abstract

Shrub bogs of the Southeast occur in areas of poorly developed internal drainage that typically but not always have highly developed organic or peat soils. Pocosins and Carolina bays are types or subclasses of shrub bogs on the coastal plains of the Carolinas and Georgia. They share roughly the same distribution patterns, soil types, floral and faunal species composition and other community attributes, but differ in geological formation. Carolina bays may contain pocosin as well as other communities, but are defined more by their unique elliptical shape and geomorphometry. The pocosin community is largely defined by its vegetation, a combination of a dense shrub understory and a sparser canopy. The community is part of a complex successional sequence of communities (sedge bogs, savannas, cedar bogs, and bay forests) that may be controlled by such factors as fire, hydroperiod, soil type, and peat depth. Pocosins and Carolina bays harbor a number of animal groups and may be locally important in their ecology. Although few species are endemic to these habitats, they may provide important refuges for a number of species. These communities are simultaneously among the least understood and most rapidly disappearing habitats of the Southeast. Forestry and agricultural clearage aremore » current impacts.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Savannah River Ecology Lab., Aiken, SC (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6193505
Report Number(s):
FWS/OBS-82/04
ON: DE83901648
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; GEORGIA; COASTAL REGIONS; NORTH CAROLINA; SOUTH CAROLINA; SWAMPS; ECOLOGY; COMMUNITIES; ENDANGERED SPECIES; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; LAND USE; MAN; PLANTS; RECOMMENDATIONS; WILD ANIMALS; ANIMALS; AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS; ECOSYSTEMS; FEDERAL REGION IV; MAMMALS; NORTH AMERICA; PRIMATES; TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS; USA; VERTEBRATES; WETLANDS 520100* -- Environment, Aquatic-- Basic Studies-- (-1989)

Citation Formats

Sharitz, R.R., and Gibbons, J.W.. Ecology of southeastern shrub bogs (pocosins) and Carolina bays: a community profile. United States: N. p., 1982. Web.
Sharitz, R.R., & Gibbons, J.W.. Ecology of southeastern shrub bogs (pocosins) and Carolina bays: a community profile. United States.
Sharitz, R.R., and Gibbons, J.W.. 1982. "Ecology of southeastern shrub bogs (pocosins) and Carolina bays: a community profile". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6193505,
title = {Ecology of southeastern shrub bogs (pocosins) and Carolina bays: a community profile},
author = {Sharitz, R.R. and Gibbons, J.W.},
abstractNote = {Shrub bogs of the Southeast occur in areas of poorly developed internal drainage that typically but not always have highly developed organic or peat soils. Pocosins and Carolina bays are types or subclasses of shrub bogs on the coastal plains of the Carolinas and Georgia. They share roughly the same distribution patterns, soil types, floral and faunal species composition and other community attributes, but differ in geological formation. Carolina bays may contain pocosin as well as other communities, but are defined more by their unique elliptical shape and geomorphometry. The pocosin community is largely defined by its vegetation, a combination of a dense shrub understory and a sparser canopy. The community is part of a complex successional sequence of communities (sedge bogs, savannas, cedar bogs, and bay forests) that may be controlled by such factors as fire, hydroperiod, soil type, and peat depth. Pocosins and Carolina bays harbor a number of animal groups and may be locally important in their ecology. Although few species are endemic to these habitats, they may provide important refuges for a number of species. These communities are simultaneously among the least understood and most rapidly disappearing habitats of the Southeast. Forestry and agricultural clearage are current impacts.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1982,
month =
}

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