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Title: Mathematical modeling of melting rates for submerged arc welding

Abstract

The effects of welding current, arc voltage, wire diameter, electrode extension (EE), electrode polarity, power source type and flux classification on melting rates (MR) have been evaluated for the submerged arc welding process. The results show that for a given heat input, greater melting rates are obtained when higher current, longer electrode extension, smaller diameter electrodes and electrode negative polarity are used. Arc voltage, power source type and flux classification do not have any significant influence on melting rates. Mathematical models to correlate process variables and melting rates have been computed from the data.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Physical Metallurgy Research Labs., Canada Center for Mineral and Energy Technology, Ottawa
OSTI Identifier:
6186776
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Weld. J. (Miami); (United States); Journal Volume: 66:5
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; WELDING RODS; ARC WELDING; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; MELTING POINTS; ELECTRIC ARCS; ELECTRIC CURRENTS; ELECTRIC POTENTIAL; ELECTRODES; POWER SUPPLIES; WELDING FLUXES; WIRES; CURRENTS; ELECTRIC DISCHARGES; ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT; EQUIPMENT; FABRICATION; JOINING; PHYSICAL PROPERTIES; THERMODYNAMIC PROPERTIES; TRANSITION TEMPERATURE; WELDING 360104* -- Metals & Alloys-- Physical Properties

Citation Formats

Chandel, R.S. Mathematical modeling of melting rates for submerged arc welding. United States: N. p., 1987. Web.
Chandel, R.S. Mathematical modeling of melting rates for submerged arc welding. United States.
Chandel, R.S. 1987. "Mathematical modeling of melting rates for submerged arc welding". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6186776,
title = {Mathematical modeling of melting rates for submerged arc welding},
author = {Chandel, R.S.},
abstractNote = {The effects of welding current, arc voltage, wire diameter, electrode extension (EE), electrode polarity, power source type and flux classification on melting rates (MR) have been evaluated for the submerged arc welding process. The results show that for a given heat input, greater melting rates are obtained when higher current, longer electrode extension, smaller diameter electrodes and electrode negative polarity are used. Arc voltage, power source type and flux classification do not have any significant influence on melting rates. Mathematical models to correlate process variables and melting rates have been computed from the data.},
doi = {},
journal = {Weld. J. (Miami); (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 66:5,
place = {United States},
year = 1987,
month = 5
}
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