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Title: Distribution of inorganic aryl and alkyl mercury compounds in rats

Abstract

Mercuric chloride (MC), phenylmercuric chloride (PMC), ethylmercuric chloride (EMC), S-ethylmercuric cysteine (EMCys), and n-butylmercuric chloride (BMC) labeled with /sup 203/Hg were subcutaneously administered to rats, and the distribution and excretion of mercury were determined. In general, alkylmercury compounds (EMC, EMCys, and BMC) were excreted more slowly and were retained in higher concentration for a longer time in the body than MC and PMC. Several alkylmercury compounds revealed different metabolic behavior which depended on the carbon-chain length of the alkyl group. Distribution of mercury in the brain was found to depend on the structure of the mercury compounds. The relation between the neurotoxicity and the structure of the mercury compounds was discussed.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Tokyo, Japan
OSTI Identifier:
6178153
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol.; (United States); Journal Volume: 13
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; MERCURY COMPOUNDS; EXCRETION; TISSUE DISTRIBUTION; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; METABOLISM; RATS; TOXICITY; UPTAKE; ANIMALS; CLEARANCE; DISTRIBUTION; MAMMALS; RODENTS; VERTEBRATES; 560305* - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology- Vertebrates- (-1987)

Citation Formats

Takeda, Y., Kunugi, T., Hoshino, O., and Ukita, T.. Distribution of inorganic aryl and alkyl mercury compounds in rats. United States: N. p., 1968. Web. doi:10.1016/0041-008X(68)90089-6.
Takeda, Y., Kunugi, T., Hoshino, O., & Ukita, T.. Distribution of inorganic aryl and alkyl mercury compounds in rats. United States. doi:10.1016/0041-008X(68)90089-6.
Takeda, Y., Kunugi, T., Hoshino, O., and Ukita, T.. Mon . "Distribution of inorganic aryl and alkyl mercury compounds in rats". United States. doi:10.1016/0041-008X(68)90089-6.
@article{osti_6178153,
title = {Distribution of inorganic aryl and alkyl mercury compounds in rats},
author = {Takeda, Y. and Kunugi, T. and Hoshino, O. and Ukita, T.},
abstractNote = {Mercuric chloride (MC), phenylmercuric chloride (PMC), ethylmercuric chloride (EMC), S-ethylmercuric cysteine (EMCys), and n-butylmercuric chloride (BMC) labeled with /sup 203/Hg were subcutaneously administered to rats, and the distribution and excretion of mercury were determined. In general, alkylmercury compounds (EMC, EMCys, and BMC) were excreted more slowly and were retained in higher concentration for a longer time in the body than MC and PMC. Several alkylmercury compounds revealed different metabolic behavior which depended on the carbon-chain length of the alkyl group. Distribution of mercury in the brain was found to depend on the structure of the mercury compounds. The relation between the neurotoxicity and the structure of the mercury compounds was discussed.},
doi = {10.1016/0041-008X(68)90089-6},
journal = {Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 13,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1968},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1968}
}
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