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Title: Thermal and electrical joint test for the helical field coils in the Advanced Toroidal Facility

Abstract

Initial feasibility studies of a number of configurations for the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) resulted in the selection of a resistive copper continuous-coil torsatron as the optimum device considering the physics program, cost, and schedule. Further conceptual design work was directed toward optimization of this configuration and, if possible, a shorter schedule. It soon became obvious that in order to shorten the schedule, a number of design and fabrication activities should proceed in parallel. This was most critical for the vacuum vessel and the helical field (HF) coils. If the HF coils were wound in place on a completed vacuum vessel, the overall schedule would be significantly (greater than or equal to12 months) longer. The approach of parallel scheduel paths requires that the HF coils be segmented into parts of less than or equal to180 of poloidal angle and that joints be made on a turn-by-turn basis when the segments are installed. It was obvious from the outset that the compact and complex geometry of the joint design presented a special challenge in the areas of reliability, assembly, maintenance, disassembly, and cost. Also, electrical, thermal, and force excursions are significant for these joints. A number of soldered, welded, brazed, electroplated,more » and bolted joints were evaluated. The evaluations examined fabrication feasibility and complexity, thermal-electrical performance at approximately two-thirds of the steady-state design conditions, and installation and assembly processes. Results of the thermal-electrical tests were analyzed and extrapolated to predict performance at peak design parameters. The final selection was a lap-type joint clamped with insulated bolts that pass through the winding packing. 3 refs., 4 figs.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6171394
Report Number(s):
CONF-851102-82
ON: DE86005589
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-84OR21400
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 11. symposium on engineering problems in fusion research, Austin, TX, USA, 18 Nov 1985; Other Information: Portions of this document are illegible in microfiche products
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; ATF TORSATRON; DESIGN; JOINTS; CONSTRUCTION; COPPER; COST; ELECTRIC CONDUCTIVITY; MAGNET COILS; STEADY-STATE CONDITIONS; CLOSED PLASMA DEVICES; ELECTRIC COILS; ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT; ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES; ELEMENTS; EQUIPMENT; METALS; PHYSICAL PROPERTIES; STELLARATORS; THERMONUCLEAR DEVICES; TORSATRON STELLARATOR; TRANSITION ELEMENTS; 700202* - Fusion Power Plant Technology- Magnet Coils & Fields

Citation Formats

Brown, R L, and Johnson, R L. Thermal and electrical joint test for the helical field coils in the Advanced Toroidal Facility. United States: N. p., 1985. Web.
Brown, R L, & Johnson, R L. Thermal and electrical joint test for the helical field coils in the Advanced Toroidal Facility. United States.
Brown, R L, and Johnson, R L. Tue . "Thermal and electrical joint test for the helical field coils in the Advanced Toroidal Facility". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/6171394.
@article{osti_6171394,
title = {Thermal and electrical joint test for the helical field coils in the Advanced Toroidal Facility},
author = {Brown, R L and Johnson, R L},
abstractNote = {Initial feasibility studies of a number of configurations for the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) resulted in the selection of a resistive copper continuous-coil torsatron as the optimum device considering the physics program, cost, and schedule. Further conceptual design work was directed toward optimization of this configuration and, if possible, a shorter schedule. It soon became obvious that in order to shorten the schedule, a number of design and fabrication activities should proceed in parallel. This was most critical for the vacuum vessel and the helical field (HF) coils. If the HF coils were wound in place on a completed vacuum vessel, the overall schedule would be significantly (greater than or equal to12 months) longer. The approach of parallel scheduel paths requires that the HF coils be segmented into parts of less than or equal to180 of poloidal angle and that joints be made on a turn-by-turn basis when the segments are installed. It was obvious from the outset that the compact and complex geometry of the joint design presented a special challenge in the areas of reliability, assembly, maintenance, disassembly, and cost. Also, electrical, thermal, and force excursions are significant for these joints. A number of soldered, welded, brazed, electroplated, and bolted joints were evaluated. The evaluations examined fabrication feasibility and complexity, thermal-electrical performance at approximately two-thirds of the steady-state design conditions, and installation and assembly processes. Results of the thermal-electrical tests were analyzed and extrapolated to predict performance at peak design parameters. The final selection was a lap-type joint clamped with insulated bolts that pass through the winding packing. 3 refs., 4 figs.},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/6171394}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1985},
month = {1}
}

Conference:
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