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Title: Lake acidification

Abstract

This paper examined a National Research Council (NRC) report called Acid Deposition: Long-Term Trends. The report has been the final word on acid deposition as the cause of acidification of lakes. The authors considered it important that the tentative nature of this report be kept in perspective so that the work of the NRC would promote rather than inhibit scientific inquiry on the lake acidification issue. In this spirit, this report proposed that degradation of storm damaged trees could increase the acidity of the forest humus and as a result the ground water which would fed local streams and lakes. They proposed that extensive forest blowdown could be a factor in acidification of surface waters.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab., TN
OSTI Identifier:
6128574
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-84OR21400
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environment; (United States); Journal Volume: 29:5
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ADIRONDACK MOUNTAINS; WATERSHEDS; FISHES; INJURIES; LAKES; ACIDIFICATION; PH VALUE; RUNOFF; SOILS; STORMS; ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS; TREES; BIODEGRADATION; ACID RAIN; HUMUS; SOIL CHEMISTRY; ANIMALS; APPALACHIAN MOUNTAINS; AQUATIC ORGANISMS; ATMOSPHERIC PRECIPITATIONS; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; CHEMISTRY; DECOMPOSITION; DISASTERS; ENVIRONMENTAL TRANSPORT; MASS TRANSFER; MOUNTAINS; PLANTS; RAIN; SURFACE WATERS; VERTEBRATES; 520200* - Environment, Aquatic- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport- (-1989); 510200 - Environment, Terrestrial- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport- (-1989)

Citation Formats

Dobson, J.E., Peplies, R.W., and Rush, R.M.. Lake acidification. United States: N. p., 1987. Web.
Dobson, J.E., Peplies, R.W., & Rush, R.M.. Lake acidification. United States.
Dobson, J.E., Peplies, R.W., and Rush, R.M.. 1987. "Lake acidification". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6128574,
title = {Lake acidification},
author = {Dobson, J.E. and Peplies, R.W. and Rush, R.M.},
abstractNote = {This paper examined a National Research Council (NRC) report called Acid Deposition: Long-Term Trends. The report has been the final word on acid deposition as the cause of acidification of lakes. The authors considered it important that the tentative nature of this report be kept in perspective so that the work of the NRC would promote rather than inhibit scientific inquiry on the lake acidification issue. In this spirit, this report proposed that degradation of storm damaged trees could increase the acidity of the forest humus and as a result the ground water which would fed local streams and lakes. They proposed that extensive forest blowdown could be a factor in acidification of surface waters.},
doi = {},
journal = {Environment; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 29:5,
place = {United States},
year = 1987,
month = 6
}
  • Although the impact of acidification on planktonic grazer food webs has been extensively studied, little is known about microbial food webs either in the water column or in the sediments. Protozoan-bacterium interactions were investigated in a chronically acidified (acid mine drainage) portion of a lake in Virginia. The authors determined the distribution, abundance, apparent specific grazing rate, and growth rate of protozoa over a pH range of 3.6 to 6.5. Protozoan abundance was lower at the most acidified site, while abundance, in general, was high compared with other systems. Specific grazing rates were uncorrelated with pH and ranged between 0.02more » and 0.23 h{sup {minus}1}, values similar to those in unacidified systems. The protozoan community from an acidified station was not better adapted to low-pH conditions than a community from an unacidified site (multivariate analysis of variance on growth rates for each community incubated at pHs 4, 5, and 6). Both communities had significantly lower growth rates at pHs 4 and 5 than at pH 6. Reduced protozoan growth rates coupled with high grazing rates and relatively higher bacterial yields (ratio of bacterial-protozoan standing stock) at low pH indicate reduced net protozoan growth efficiency and a metabolic cost of acidification to the protozoan community. However, the presence of an abundant, neutrophilic protozoan community and high bacterial grazing rates indicates that acidification of Lake Anna has not inhibited the bacterium-protozoan link of the sediment microbial food web.« less
  • A comprehensive understanding of the effects of liming on the environment was missing until the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) pulled researchers together to conduct integrated lake liming studies begun about six years ago. What researchers found is that liming is a cost-effective and environmentally sound method to treat acidic lakes so fish and other organisms may thrive. To research the acidification process, EPRI studied three lakes: Woods, Panther, and Sagamore, in the Adirondacks where most of the acidified lakes in the U.S. are located. The study done from 1976-84 and called Integrated Lake-Watershed Acidification Study (ILWAS) developed a generalmore » theory for understanding the effect of natural and man-made processes on lake chemistry. The theory is incorporated into a computer simulation model that accurately predicts a lake's vulnerability to acidification.« less
  • The ranked acid sensitivities of six common crustacean zooplankton taxa were determined from a multilake field survey in Ontario and from laboratory bioassays. The two approaches gave the same ranking (from most to least sensitive): Daphnia galeata mendotae, Daphnia retrocurva, and Skistodiaptomus oregonensis > Diaphanosoma birgei > Mesocyclops edax > Bosmina longirostris. This finding suggests that acidification has caused the widespread damage which has been documented for the zooplankton of Ontario and northeastern US lakes. 24 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.
  • In order to assess how brown waters will react with changes in acid inputs caused by acid precipitation, it is important to estimate quantitatively the concentration of organic anions in solution. A new method of determining the organic anion component of brown waters was developed. The approach was then tested on water samples collected in Nova Scotia. The method shows that, with a knowledge of pH, acid neutralization capacity (ANC), and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), a titration curve which estimates the change in organic anion concentration and its relationship to changes in ANC can be produced. This method was appliedmore » to the waters of Sjervatjern. Preliminary results based on estimated data suggest that because of the already low pH values of the Norwegian lake water, organic acids will not offer much neutralization capacity to inputs of mineral acids. 11 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.« less
  • The responses to pH of abiotic interactions between dissolved humic substances, iron and phosphate were investigated by examining redistributions of [sup 55]FeCl[sub 3] and [sup 32]PO[sub 4][sup 3[minus]] added to epilimnetic lakewater from Lake Skjervatjern. The simultaneous movement of [sup 55]Fe and [sup 32]P to fractions of 10,000-20,000 and > 100,000 Daltons nominal molecular weight, as indicated by Sephadex gel filtration, diminished in response to decreasing pH. Variations in transformations to larger molecular size fractions with incubation time revealed by gel filtration were erratic, but indicated that transformations of added [sup 55]Fe and [sup 32]P are complete after circa 24more » h. Movement of [sup 32]P to particle size fractions (> 0.2 [mu]m) was not dependent on pH, whilst transformations of [sup 55]Fe to material of particle size increased as pH was lowered. Precipitation of added [sup 55]Fe and [sup 32]P was minimal at all pH values tested. Responses of precipitation losses to pH were not coincident for both radionuclides. 22 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.« less