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Title: Inborn anemias in mice

Abstract

hereditary anemias of mice have been the chief objects of investigation. At present under study are four macrocytic anemias, five hemolytic anemias, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, an ..cap alpha..-thalassemia, and a new target-cell anemia. Each of these blood dyscrasias is caused by the action of a unique mutant gene, which determines the structure of different intracellular molecules, and thus controls a different metabolic process. Thus our wide range of different hereditary anemias has considerable potential for uncovering many different aspects of hemopoietic homeostatic mechanisms in the mouse. Each anemia is studied through: (a) characterization of peripheral blood values, (b) determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions, (c) measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis, (d) histological and biochemical study of blood-forming tissue, (e) functional tests of the stem cell component, (f) examination of responses to erythroid stimuli, and (g) transplantation of tissue between individuals of differently affected genotypes.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Jackson Lab., Bar Harbor, ME (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6121812
Report Number(s):
DOE/EV/03264-20
ON: DE81029128; TRN: 81-015456
DOE Contract Number:
AS02-76EV03264
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; ANEMIAS; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; BLOOD CHEMISTRY; BLOOD FORMATION; HOMEOSTASIS; IRON; METABOLISM; MICE; RADIOSENSITIVITY; TRANSPLANTS; ANIMALS; DISEASES; ELEMENTS; HEMIC DISEASES; MAMMALS; METALS; RODENTS; SYMPTOMS; TRANSITION ELEMENTS; VERTEBRATES; 550900* - Pathology; 560152 - Radiation Effects on Animals- Animals

Citation Formats

Bernstein, S.E., Barker, J.E., and Russell, E.S. Inborn anemias in mice. United States: N. p., 1981. Web.
Bernstein, S.E., Barker, J.E., & Russell, E.S. Inborn anemias in mice. United States.
Bernstein, S.E., Barker, J.E., and Russell, E.S. 1981. "Inborn anemias in mice". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6121812,
title = {Inborn anemias in mice},
author = {Bernstein, S.E. and Barker, J.E. and Russell, E.S.},
abstractNote = {hereditary anemias of mice have been the chief objects of investigation. At present under study are four macrocytic anemias, five hemolytic anemias, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, an ..cap alpha..-thalassemia, and a new target-cell anemia. Each of these blood dyscrasias is caused by the action of a unique mutant gene, which determines the structure of different intracellular molecules, and thus controls a different metabolic process. Thus our wide range of different hereditary anemias has considerable potential for uncovering many different aspects of hemopoietic homeostatic mechanisms in the mouse. Each anemia is studied through: (a) characterization of peripheral blood values, (b) determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions, (c) measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis, (d) histological and biochemical study of blood-forming tissue, (e) functional tests of the stem cell component, (f) examination of responses to erythroid stimuli, and (g) transplantation of tissue between individuals of differently affected genotypes.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1981,
month = 6
}

Technical Report:
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  • Investigations related to determination of acute and longtemn effects of whole-body irradiation on normal, slightly anemic, and severely anemic mice differing in W-series genes are reported. Continuation of implantation studies on blood-forming tissue is also discussed along with investigations of normal and WW/sup v/ anemic mice to erythropoietia and to oxygen deprivation, improbability of pituitary defect in W-series anemias, studies of two types of jaundice in mice, and studies of specific radiation protection factor. (J.R.D.)
  • The nature of the defects that shorten the effective lifespan of red blood cells in the circulation and which gave rise to anemia, jaundice and to spleen, liver and heart enlargement are studied because they so closely parallel inherited hemolytic anemias in man. In mice, ''hemolytic disease'' initiated by the ja, sph, sph/sup ha/, or the nb genes has been traced to abnormalities in the protein components of their red cell membranes. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of detergent solubilized membranes reveal that in the different genetic types one or more of the major high molecular weight proteins called spectrins is decreasedmore » or totally missing. It is one thing to observe a correlation between missing or defective components in selected analytical procedures, and another to establish a causal relationship between the two. To investigate the possible interrelationships, we examined the associations between spectrin or ankyrin content, the severity of the resulting anemia, red cell osmotic fragilities, and the capacity of cells from each genotype to be deformed in a continuous osmotic gradient at constant sheer stress. Our findings indicate that sensitivity to osmotic stress, cell rigidity (inadequate deformability), deficiency of spectrin or ankyrin, and the severity of the anemia, are statistically highly correlated. 11 refs., 3 tabs.« less
  • The basic purpose of this study is the delineation and exploitation of inborn anemias of the laboratory mouse, carried out by utilization of genetically homogeneous stocks segregating only for anemia-producing genes; by physiological and histological descriptions of each condition at all stages in the life history; by determination of tissue sites of primary gene action through tissue culture studies, tissue transplantation and parabiosis experiments; by analysis of reactions of normal and anemic mice to a variety of stressful stimuli, including x-irradiation, hypoxia, and toxic chemicals, and by biochemical comparisons between tissues, especially erythrocytes and hemopoietic cells of normal vs eachmore » type of anemic mouse. At present 16 single-locus anemias are known in the mouse, plus one with multifactorial inheritance (the autoimmune hemolytic anemia of NZB inbred mice). Of these, six are maintained only by the Jackson Laboratory, and two others have but one additional source. Effects of anemia-producing mutant alleles of these loci (an; f; ja; ha; Hba/sup th/; mk; nb; Sl and Sl/sup d/; sla; sph; and W, W/sup v/, W/sup J/ and 10 other putative W-alleles) are currently under investigation at the Jackson Laboratory. 15 refs.« less