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Title: Role of microstructural degradation in the heat affected zone of 2.25Cr-1Mo steel weldments on subscale features during steam oxidation and their role in weld failures

Abstract

Microstructural degradations in the base metal adjacent to the weld pool, i.e., the heat-affected zone (HAZ), caused during welding of 2.25Cr-1Mo steel, were characterized by electron and optical microscopy of different regions of the weldments. In order to study the influence of the microstructural degradations on scaling kinetics in steam and the resulting subscale features, samples of the base metal, the HAZ, and weld metal specimens were extracted from the weldment and oxidized in an environment of 35 pct steam + nitrogen at 873 K for 10 hours. Oxide scales formed in the three regions and the underlying subscales were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). Influence of the free chromium content in the three weldment regions on protective scale formation and on the subscale features has been investigated. As the principal achievement, this study has clearly shown the occurrence of oxidation-induced void formation in the subscale zone and grain boundary cavitation in the neighboring area during steam oxidation of the HAZ. This article also discusses the possible role of oxidation-induced void formation and grain boundary cavitation in the inferior service life of welds in 2.25Cr-1Mo steel components.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech. (Australia). Dept. of Communication and Electronic Engineering
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
611589
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Metallurgical and Materials Transactions. A, Physical Metallurgy and Materials Science; Journal Volume: 29; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: PBD: Feb 1998
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; MICROSTRUCTURE; HEAT AFFECTED ZONE; STEEL-CR2MO; OXIDATION; WELDED JOINTS; CORROSION RESISTANCE

Citation Formats

Raman, R.K.S. Role of microstructural degradation in the heat affected zone of 2.25Cr-1Mo steel weldments on subscale features during steam oxidation and their role in weld failures. United States: N. p., 1998. Web. doi:10.1007/s11661-998-0139-5.
Raman, R.K.S. Role of microstructural degradation in the heat affected zone of 2.25Cr-1Mo steel weldments on subscale features during steam oxidation and their role in weld failures. United States. doi:10.1007/s11661-998-0139-5.
Raman, R.K.S. 1998. "Role of microstructural degradation in the heat affected zone of 2.25Cr-1Mo steel weldments on subscale features during steam oxidation and their role in weld failures". United States. doi:10.1007/s11661-998-0139-5.
@article{osti_611589,
title = {Role of microstructural degradation in the heat affected zone of 2.25Cr-1Mo steel weldments on subscale features during steam oxidation and their role in weld failures},
author = {Raman, R.K.S.},
abstractNote = {Microstructural degradations in the base metal adjacent to the weld pool, i.e., the heat-affected zone (HAZ), caused during welding of 2.25Cr-1Mo steel, were characterized by electron and optical microscopy of different regions of the weldments. In order to study the influence of the microstructural degradations on scaling kinetics in steam and the resulting subscale features, samples of the base metal, the HAZ, and weld metal specimens were extracted from the weldment and oxidized in an environment of 35 pct steam + nitrogen at 873 K for 10 hours. Oxide scales formed in the three regions and the underlying subscales were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). Influence of the free chromium content in the three weldment regions on protective scale formation and on the subscale features has been investigated. As the principal achievement, this study has clearly shown the occurrence of oxidation-induced void formation in the subscale zone and grain boundary cavitation in the neighboring area during steam oxidation of the HAZ. This article also discusses the possible role of oxidation-induced void formation and grain boundary cavitation in the inferior service life of welds in 2.25Cr-1Mo steel components.},
doi = {10.1007/s11661-998-0139-5},
journal = {Metallurgical and Materials Transactions. A, Physical Metallurgy and Materials Science},
number = 2,
volume = 29,
place = {United States},
year = 1998,
month = 2
}
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