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Title: Radiation-oxidation of polymers

Abstract

Radiation effects on polymers in the presence of air are characterized by complicated phenomena such as dose-rate effects and post-irradiation degradation. Most applications of polymeric materials in radiation environments involve air atmospheres. Taking account of oxidation effects and time-dependent phenomena is a necessity for understanding materials changes which occur during aging, and for dealing with issues of materials lifetime prediction, aging monitoring, materials selection, and material stabilization. Time-dependent radiation-degradation effects can be understood mechanistically in terms of: (1) features of the free radical chain-reaction chemistry underlying the oxidation, and (2) oxygen diffusion effects. A profiling technique has been developed to study heterogeneous degradation resulting from oxygen diffusion, and kinetic schemes have been developed to allow long-term aging predictions from short-term high-dose-rate experiments. These methodologies have been successfully applied for predicting degradation rates of a number of different materials under ambient nuclear environments. Low molecular weight additives which act either as free-radical scavengers or else as energy-scavengers are effective as stabilizers in radiation-oxidation environments. Non-radical oxidation mechanisms, involving species such as ozone, can also be important in the radiation-oxidation of polymers. 14 refs., 13 figs.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
6050016
Report Number(s):
SAND-89-1756C; CONF-8907108-1
ON: DE89014135
DOE Contract Number:  
AC04-76DP00789
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: IAEA advisory group meeting on radiation degradation of polymers, Takasaki, Japan, 17-20 Jul 1989; Other Information: Portions of this document are illegible in microfiche products
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; POLYMERS; RADIATION EFFECTS; AGING; AIR; CHEMICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; DIFFUSION; ELONGATION; IRRADIATION; MECHANICAL PROPERTIES; OXIDATION; OZONE; PHYSICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; PROPYLENE; PVC; TIME DEPENDENCE; ALKENES; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; CHEMISTRY; CHLORINATED ALIPHATIC HYDROCARBONS; FLUIDS; GASES; HALOGENATED ALIPHATIC HYDROCARBONS; HYDROCARBONS; ORGANIC CHLORINE COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC HALOGEN COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC POLYMERS; POLYVINYLS; RADIATION CHEMISTRY; 360605* - Materials- Radiation Effects; 360604 - Materials- Corrosion, Erosion, & Degradation

Citation Formats

Clough, R. L., and Gillen, K. T. Radiation-oxidation of polymers. United States: N. p., 1989. Web.
Clough, R. L., & Gillen, K. T. Radiation-oxidation of polymers. United States.
Clough, R. L., and Gillen, K. T. Sun . "Radiation-oxidation of polymers". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/6050016.
@article{osti_6050016,
title = {Radiation-oxidation of polymers},
author = {Clough, R. L. and Gillen, K. T.},
abstractNote = {Radiation effects on polymers in the presence of air are characterized by complicated phenomena such as dose-rate effects and post-irradiation degradation. Most applications of polymeric materials in radiation environments involve air atmospheres. Taking account of oxidation effects and time-dependent phenomena is a necessity for understanding materials changes which occur during aging, and for dealing with issues of materials lifetime prediction, aging monitoring, materials selection, and material stabilization. Time-dependent radiation-degradation effects can be understood mechanistically in terms of: (1) features of the free radical chain-reaction chemistry underlying the oxidation, and (2) oxygen diffusion effects. A profiling technique has been developed to study heterogeneous degradation resulting from oxygen diffusion, and kinetic schemes have been developed to allow long-term aging predictions from short-term high-dose-rate experiments. These methodologies have been successfully applied for predicting degradation rates of a number of different materials under ambient nuclear environments. Low molecular weight additives which act either as free-radical scavengers or else as energy-scavengers are effective as stabilizers in radiation-oxidation environments. Non-radical oxidation mechanisms, involving species such as ozone, can also be important in the radiation-oxidation of polymers. 14 refs., 13 figs.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1989},
month = {1}
}

Conference:
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