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Title: Geosynchronous earth orbit base propulsion - electric propulsion options

Abstract

Electric propulsion and chemical propulsion requirements for a geosynchronous earth orbit (GEO) base were analyzed. The base is resupplied from the Space Station's low earth orbit. Orbit-transfer Delta-Vs, nodal-regression Delta-Vs and orbit-maintenance Delta-Vs were considered. For resupplying the base, a cryogenic oxygen/hydrogen (O2/H2) orbital transfer vehicle (OTV) is currently-baselined. Comparisons of several electric propulsion options with the O2/H2 OTV were conducted. Propulsion requirements for missions related to the GEO base were also analyzed. Payload data for the GEO missions were drawn from current mission data bases. Detailed electric propulsion module designs are presented. Mission analyses and propulsion analyses for the GEO-delivered payloads are included. 23 references.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6033103
Report Number(s):
AIAA-Paper-87-0990; CONF-870558-
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 19. international electric propulsion conference, Colorado Springs, CO, USA, 11 May 1987
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; PROPULSION SYSTEMS; SPECIFICATIONS; SPACE VEHICLES; AMMONIA; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; HYDRIDES; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; NITROGEN COMPOUNDS; NITROGEN HYDRIDES; VEHICLES 420200* -- Engineering-- Facilities, Equipment, & Techniques

Citation Formats

Palaszewski, B. Geosynchronous earth orbit base propulsion - electric propulsion options. United States: N. p., 1987. Web.
Palaszewski, B. Geosynchronous earth orbit base propulsion - electric propulsion options. United States.
Palaszewski, B. 1987. "Geosynchronous earth orbit base propulsion - electric propulsion options". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6033103,
title = {Geosynchronous earth orbit base propulsion - electric propulsion options},
author = {Palaszewski, B.},
abstractNote = {Electric propulsion and chemical propulsion requirements for a geosynchronous earth orbit (GEO) base were analyzed. The base is resupplied from the Space Station's low earth orbit. Orbit-transfer Delta-Vs, nodal-regression Delta-Vs and orbit-maintenance Delta-Vs were considered. For resupplying the base, a cryogenic oxygen/hydrogen (O2/H2) orbital transfer vehicle (OTV) is currently-baselined. Comparisons of several electric propulsion options with the O2/H2 OTV were conducted. Propulsion requirements for missions related to the GEO base were also analyzed. Payload data for the GEO missions were drawn from current mission data bases. Detailed electric propulsion module designs are presented. Mission analyses and propulsion analyses for the GEO-delivered payloads are included. 23 references.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1987,
month = 1
}

Conference:
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