skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Philosophic roots of Western antinuclear movements

Abstract

The popular campaign in the West against nuclear weapons (also called the antinuclear movement or the peace movement) has been waged for over 30 years. Although one can debate its impact and influence, one cannot doubt its staying power. The antinuclear movement may rise--as it did in the late 1950's and late 1970s--and fall--as it did in the mid-1960s and mid-1980s--but it is never likely to recede and disappear entirely. As long as there are those who oppose the continued development and deployment of nuclear weapons, the movement will remain with us. The antinuclear movement in North America and Western Europe--particularly during its most recent phase of activity (the late 1970s/early 1980s)--has been the object of a great deal of scrutiny. Little, however, has been written about the causes behind the antinuclear movements. During the two peaks of the antinuclear movement, several highly visible issues surrounding nuclear weapons arose in the West. In the late 1950s and early 1960s, NATO's decision to deploy nuclear-armed medium-range ballistic missiles in Western Europe, concerns about the health hazards of atmospheric nuclear testing, and continuing expansion of the U.S.-Soviet nuclear arms race evoked a strong public response. Twenty years later, the neutron bomb andmore » the INF decision revitalized the movement, both in America and in Europe. Yet these were only the catalysts to the emergence or reemergence of the antinuclear movement; deeper forces were also at work.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Rand Corp., Santa Monica, CA (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6023941
Report Number(s):
AD-A-228303/4/XAB; RAND/P-7601
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
98 NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT, SAFEGUARDS, AND PHYSICAL PROTECTION; ARMS CONTROL; POLITICAL ASPECTS; DECISION MAKING; HAZARDS; HISTORICAL ASPECTS; NATO; NORTH AMERICA; NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS; NUCLEAR WEAPONS; PUBLIC OPINION; WESTERN EUROPE; EUROPE; EXPLOSIONS; INSTITUTIONAL FACTORS; INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS; WEAPONS; 350100* - Arms Control- Policy, Negotiations, & Legislation- (1987-)

Citation Formats

Bitzinger, R A. Philosophic roots of Western antinuclear movements. United States: N. p., 1989. Web.
Bitzinger, R A. Philosophic roots of Western antinuclear movements. United States.
Bitzinger, R A. Sun . "Philosophic roots of Western antinuclear movements". United States.
@article{osti_6023941,
title = {Philosophic roots of Western antinuclear movements},
author = {Bitzinger, R A},
abstractNote = {The popular campaign in the West against nuclear weapons (also called the antinuclear movement or the peace movement) has been waged for over 30 years. Although one can debate its impact and influence, one cannot doubt its staying power. The antinuclear movement may rise--as it did in the late 1950's and late 1970s--and fall--as it did in the mid-1960s and mid-1980s--but it is never likely to recede and disappear entirely. As long as there are those who oppose the continued development and deployment of nuclear weapons, the movement will remain with us. The antinuclear movement in North America and Western Europe--particularly during its most recent phase of activity (the late 1970s/early 1980s)--has been the object of a great deal of scrutiny. Little, however, has been written about the causes behind the antinuclear movements. During the two peaks of the antinuclear movement, several highly visible issues surrounding nuclear weapons arose in the West. In the late 1950s and early 1960s, NATO's decision to deploy nuclear-armed medium-range ballistic missiles in Western Europe, concerns about the health hazards of atmospheric nuclear testing, and continuing expansion of the U.S.-Soviet nuclear arms race evoked a strong public response. Twenty years later, the neutron bomb and the INF decision revitalized the movement, both in America and in Europe. Yet these were only the catalysts to the emergence or reemergence of the antinuclear movement; deeper forces were also at work.},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/6023941}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1989},
month = {10}
}

Technical Report:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that may hold this item. Keep in mind that many technical reports are not cataloged in WorldCat.

Save / Share: