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Title: Effects of low-intensity pulsed electromagnetic fields on the early development of sea urchins

Abstract

The effects of weak electromagnetic signals on the early development of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus have been studied. The duration and repetition of the pulses were similar to those used for bone healing in clinical practice. A sequence of pulses, applied for a time ranging from 2 to 4 h, accelerates the cleavages of sea urchin embryo cells. This effect can be quantitatively assessed by determining the time shifts induced by the applied electromagnetic field on the completion of the first and second cleavages in a population of fertilized eggs. The exposed embryos were allowed to develop up to the pluteus stage, showing no abnormalities.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Genova, Italy
OSTI Identifier:
6017589
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biophys. J.; (United States); Journal Volume: 51:6
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; EMBRYOS; CLEAVAGE; SEA URCHINS; ONTOGENESIS; ANIMALS; AQUATIC ORGANISMS; CRYSTAL STRUCTURE; ECHINODERMS; INVERTEBRATES; MICROSTRUCTURE; 560400* - Other Environmental Pollutant Effects

Citation Formats

Falugi, C., Grattarola, M., and Prestipino, G.. Effects of low-intensity pulsed electromagnetic fields on the early development of sea urchins. United States: N. p., 1987. Web. doi:10.1016/S0006-3495(87)83429-X.
Falugi, C., Grattarola, M., & Prestipino, G.. Effects of low-intensity pulsed electromagnetic fields on the early development of sea urchins. United States. doi:10.1016/S0006-3495(87)83429-X.
Falugi, C., Grattarola, M., and Prestipino, G.. Mon . "Effects of low-intensity pulsed electromagnetic fields on the early development of sea urchins". United States. doi:10.1016/S0006-3495(87)83429-X.
@article{osti_6017589,
title = {Effects of low-intensity pulsed electromagnetic fields on the early development of sea urchins},
author = {Falugi, C. and Grattarola, M. and Prestipino, G.},
abstractNote = {The effects of weak electromagnetic signals on the early development of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus have been studied. The duration and repetition of the pulses were similar to those used for bone healing in clinical practice. A sequence of pulses, applied for a time ranging from 2 to 4 h, accelerates the cleavages of sea urchin embryo cells. This effect can be quantitatively assessed by determining the time shifts induced by the applied electromagnetic field on the completion of the first and second cleavages in a population of fertilized eggs. The exposed embryos were allowed to develop up to the pluteus stage, showing no abnormalities.},
doi = {10.1016/S0006-3495(87)83429-X},
journal = {Biophys. J.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 51:6,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 1987},
month = {Mon Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 1987}
}
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