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Title: Birds of the Hanford site: nest site selection

Abstract

At least 62 species of birds regularly nest on the 1400 km/sup 2/ Hanford Site in the semi-arid interior of southcentral Washington. Birds showed nesting preferences for different kinds of vegetation, special natural landscape features and certain kinds of man-made structures. Vegetational nest site preferences were categorized as shrubsteppe, natural coppice, planted trees and cattail-reed marsh. The nonvegetational nest-site preferences were categorized as cliff, rock talus, riverine islands and industrial structures. Natural coppice vegetation was preferred by colorful passerine birds. Planted trees were selected by raptors, crows, ravens, herons and magpies. Shrubsteppe plant communities occupy most of the land area of the Hanford Site; only thirteen species of birds chose to nest in them. Nest-site selection by birds can be used for wildlife mitigation practices associated with the siting, construction and operation of energy related industries on the Hanford Site and in other undeveloped semi-arid regions in the western United States. 22 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
5990210
Report Number(s):
PNL-SA-11302
ON: DE85006087
DOE Contract Number:
AC06-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Portions are illegible in microfiche products
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; HANFORD RESERVATION; BIRDS; HABITAT; SPECIES DIVERSITY; ANIMALS; NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS; US DOE; US ERDA; US ORGANIZATIONS; VERTEBRATES; 510500* - Environment, Terrestrial- Site Resource & Use Studies- (-1989)

Citation Formats

Rickard, W.H., and Fitzner, R.E.. Birds of the Hanford site: nest site selection. United States: N. p., 1983. Web.
Rickard, W.H., & Fitzner, R.E.. Birds of the Hanford site: nest site selection. United States.
Rickard, W.H., and Fitzner, R.E.. 1983. "Birds of the Hanford site: nest site selection". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5990210,
title = {Birds of the Hanford site: nest site selection},
author = {Rickard, W.H. and Fitzner, R.E.},
abstractNote = {At least 62 species of birds regularly nest on the 1400 km/sup 2/ Hanford Site in the semi-arid interior of southcentral Washington. Birds showed nesting preferences for different kinds of vegetation, special natural landscape features and certain kinds of man-made structures. Vegetational nest site preferences were categorized as shrubsteppe, natural coppice, planted trees and cattail-reed marsh. The nonvegetational nest-site preferences were categorized as cliff, rock talus, riverine islands and industrial structures. Natural coppice vegetation was preferred by colorful passerine birds. Planted trees were selected by raptors, crows, ravens, herons and magpies. Shrubsteppe plant communities occupy most of the land area of the Hanford Site; only thirteen species of birds chose to nest in them. Nest-site selection by birds can be used for wildlife mitigation practices associated with the siting, construction and operation of energy related industries on the Hanford Site and in other undeveloped semi-arid regions in the western United States. 22 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1983,
month = 3
}

Technical Report:
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  • Habitat at 70 bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) nest sites was quantified and compared with evaluations at 139 random habitat plots located in the Chesapeake Bay region of Maryland. Bald eagles selected vegetationally open habitats near water and away from selected human activities relative to random habitat plots. Successful nest sites were located in denser forest stands farther from water and unoccupied structures than unsuccessful nest sites.
  • Raptor breeding populations of grasslands and semi-arid grasslands of western North America include varying densities of three Buteo species, the Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis), Ferruginous Hawk (Buteo regalis) and Swainson's Hawk (Buteo swainsoni). These three species are behaviorially rather similar in their diurnal activity patterns and foraging habitats and exhibit similar diets comprised of small mammals and birds. Principal component analysis and discriminant function analysis were used to describe key similarities and differences in nest site selection of the three Buteo species. Differences in nest site selection may offer an explanation of how the three Buteo species may nest sympatricallymore » and at times successfully at distances of less than 0.5 km despite apparent similarities in use of other resources. 15 refs., 1 fig., 9 tabs.« less
  • The U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) conducts ecological monitoring on the Hanford Site to collect and track data needed to ensure compliance with an array of environmental laws, regulations, and policies governing DOE activities. Ecological monitoring data provide baseline information about the plants, animals, and habitat under DOE-RL stewardship at Hanford required for decision-making under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The Hanford Site Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP, DOE/EIS-0222-F) which is the Environmental Impact Statement for Hanford Site activities, helps ensure that DOE-RL, its contractors, and othermore » entities conducting activities on the Hanford Site are in compliance with NEPA. The Hanford Site supports a large and diverse community of raptorial birds (Fitzner et al. 1981), with 26 species of raptors observed on the Hanford Site.« less
  • The Department of Energy has recently entered into agreements with the Washington State Department of Ecology, the Environmental Protection Agency, and Hanford Site contractors to focus work activities on cleanup and stabilization of radioactive and hazardous waste sites located at the Hanford Site in southern Washington. A list of 235 known birds that have been observed at the Hanford Site is given along with a status rating for abundance and seasonal occurrence. Previously published bird lists from the Hanford Site are included as well as the author observations from 1977 to 1990. Of the 235 species listed, 35 are consideredmore » common and 38 are listed as accidentals. All but nine birds on the Hanford Site list have previously been documented by the Audubon Society to occur within a 25-mile radius of the Tri-Cities. The nine birds that are not on the Audubon list, however, have been documented in other parts of eastern Washington. A list of hypothetical birds that have been documented within 50 miles of the Hanford Site but not actually observed at the Site is also provided. This is the most complete list of birds published to date from the Hanford Site and substantially augments other previously published lists by almost 100 species. 20 refs., 1 fig., 3 tab.« less
  • The US Department of Energy has entered into agreements with the Washington State Department of Ecology, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and Hanford Site contractors to focus work activities on cleanup and stabilization of radioactive and hazardous waste sites located at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington. Ecological characterization is an essential part of the remediation process, and the identification of biotic components such as bird species that could be impacted by cleanup activities is an important part of the initial environmental characterizations. Site characterization work has resulted in this list of 238 birds that have been observed at themore » Hanford Site. This list is presented with a status rating for abundance and seasonal occurrence.« less