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Title: Radiation preservation of foods of plant origin. Part 2. Onions and other bulb crops

Abstract

The various factors contributing to post harvest losses in onions and other bulb crops are briefly outlined in terms of the current storage methods. The present status of research on sprout inhibition by irradiation is reviewed in detail with respect to dose requirements, effect of time interval between harvest and irradiation, and the influence of environment on sprouting during storage. Biochemical mechanisms of sprout inhibition, metabolic and compositional changes (particularly sugars, anthocyanins, flavor and lachrymatory principles), and the culinary and processing qualities of irradiated onions are discussed. The future prospects for the commercial irradiation for sprout inhibition of bulb crops are considered.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, India
OSTI Identifier:
5948161
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: CRC Crit. Rev. Food Sci. Nutr.; (United States); Journal Volume: 21:2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; ONIONS; RADIOPRESERVATION; BIOCHEMISTRY; BULBS; CHEMICAL COMPOSITION; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; METABOLISM; SPROUT INHIBITION; CHEMISTRY; FOOD; INHIBITION; IRRADIATION; PLANTS; PRESERVATION; VEGETABLES; 560132* - Radiation Effects on Microorganisms- Food Preservation- (-1987)

Citation Formats

Thomas, P. Radiation preservation of foods of plant origin. Part 2. Onions and other bulb crops. United States: N. p., 1984. Web. doi:10.1080/10408398409527398.
Thomas, P. Radiation preservation of foods of plant origin. Part 2. Onions and other bulb crops. United States. doi:10.1080/10408398409527398.
Thomas, P. Sun . "Radiation preservation of foods of plant origin. Part 2. Onions and other bulb crops". United States. doi:10.1080/10408398409527398.
@article{osti_5948161,
title = {Radiation preservation of foods of plant origin. Part 2. Onions and other bulb crops},
author = {Thomas, P.},
abstractNote = {The various factors contributing to post harvest losses in onions and other bulb crops are briefly outlined in terms of the current storage methods. The present status of research on sprout inhibition by irradiation is reviewed in detail with respect to dose requirements, effect of time interval between harvest and irradiation, and the influence of environment on sprouting during storage. Biochemical mechanisms of sprout inhibition, metabolic and compositional changes (particularly sugars, anthocyanins, flavor and lachrymatory principles), and the culinary and processing qualities of irradiated onions are discussed. The future prospects for the commercial irradiation for sprout inhibition of bulb crops are considered.},
doi = {10.1080/10408398409527398},
journal = {CRC Crit. Rev. Food Sci. Nutr.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 21:2,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1984},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1984}
}
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