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Title: Site exploration for rock-mechanics field tests in the Grouse Canyon Member, Belted Range Tuff, U12g Tunnel Complex, Nevada Test Site

Abstract

This report describes site exploration work completed in support of planned rock-mechanics field tests in the Grouse Canyon Member of the Belted Range Ruff at Nevada Test Site`s, G-Tunnel. As part of this work, the Rock Mechanics Drift (RMD) and the Rock Mass Property Alcove (RMPA) were mined and three coreholes drilled. The results of mapping and corehole logging are displayed, described, and analyzed.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fenix and Scisson, Inc., Mercury, NV (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
59454
Report Number(s):
SAND-81-1897
ON: DE82014521; TRN: 82:014203
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-76DP00789
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: DN: Portions of this document are illegible; PBD: Feb 1982
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; 05 NUCLEAR FUELS; RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL; SITE SELECTION; UNDERGROUND DISPOSAL; NEVADA TEST SITE; TUFF; ROCK MECHANICS; FIELD TESTS; GEOLOGIC DEPOSITS; FRACTURES; BOREHOLES; WELL LOGGING; MAPPING; GEOLOGIC FAULTS; Yucca Mountain Project

Citation Formats

Langkopf, B.S., and Eshom, E. Site exploration for rock-mechanics field tests in the Grouse Canyon Member, Belted Range Tuff, U12g Tunnel Complex, Nevada Test Site. United States: N. p., 1982. Web.
Langkopf, B.S., & Eshom, E. Site exploration for rock-mechanics field tests in the Grouse Canyon Member, Belted Range Tuff, U12g Tunnel Complex, Nevada Test Site. United States.
Langkopf, B.S., and Eshom, E. Mon . "Site exploration for rock-mechanics field tests in the Grouse Canyon Member, Belted Range Tuff, U12g Tunnel Complex, Nevada Test Site". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_59454,
title = {Site exploration for rock-mechanics field tests in the Grouse Canyon Member, Belted Range Tuff, U12g Tunnel Complex, Nevada Test Site},
author = {Langkopf, B.S. and Eshom, E.},
abstractNote = {This report describes site exploration work completed in support of planned rock-mechanics field tests in the Grouse Canyon Member of the Belted Range Ruff at Nevada Test Site`s, G-Tunnel. As part of this work, the Rock Mechanics Drift (RMD) and the Rock Mass Property Alcove (RMPA) were mined and three coreholes drilled. The results of mapping and corehole logging are displayed, described, and analyzed.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 1982},
month = {Mon Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 1982}
}

Technical Report:
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  • This report summarizes the results of petrochemical studies of welded Grouse Canyon Member tuff in the G-Tunnel Underground Rock Mechanics Facility (GTUF), carried out in support of thermomechanical testing. The Grouse Canyon Member in GTUF is divided into three partial-cooling units (A, B, and C from the base upward), separated by tuffaceous breccias that mark partial cooling breaks. Unit B is most suitable for in situ experiments due to the presence of a thick, densely welded, relatively homogeneous central zone. Unit A is not favorable due to thinness, lithologic variability and extensive zeolitization. Unit B is not favorable due tomore » variable degree of welding, and irregular zones of clay alteration. The Grouse Canyon Member is a marginally peralkaline comendite tuff; whole-rock agpaitic indices are close to 1.0. Phenocrysts present include sodic sanidine (An{sub 4}Ab{sub 55}Or{sub 41}), quartz, and minor clinopyroxene, fayalitic olivine, biotite, and Fe/Ti oxides. Devitrification yields axiolitic and spherulitic sodic sanidine and quartz, granophyric quartz, and minor sodic pyroxene and amphibole. These assemblages are characteristic of iron-rich peralkaline silicic tuffs. This differs slightly from the Topopah Spring Member at Yucca Mountain, in which there are no olivine or pyroxene phenocrysts and no ferromagnesian devitrification phases. Zeolitization in Unit A and the underlying Tunnel Bed 5 has added CaO from, and released Na{sub 2}O to, groundwater under oxidizing conditions. 26 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs.« less
  • G-Tunnel at Nevada Test Site (NTS) is the site of thermal and thermomechanical experiments examining the feasibility of emplacing heat-producing nuclear wastes in silicic tuffs. This report describes the general stratigraphy, mineralogy, and bulk chemistry of welded portions of the Grouse Canyon Member of the Belted Range Tuff, the unit in which most of these experiments will be performed. The geologic characteristics of the Grouse Canyon Member are compared with those of the Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff, presently the preferred horizon for an actual waste repository at Yucca Mountain, near the southwest boundary of Nevada Test Site.more » This comparison suggests that test results obtained in welded tuff from G-Tunnel are applicable, with limitations, to evaluation of the Topopah Spring Member at Yucca Mountain.« less
  • Thermal conductivity and thermal expansion data for tuffs of the devitrified welded Grouse Canyon Member and for the zeolitized nonwelded Tunnel Bed 5 are presented. Thermal properties have been found to be a function of mineralogy and saturation. Thermal conductivity results also are affected by matrix and fracture porosity, and thermal expansion behavior is a function of confining and fluid pressures. This work is being performed as part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project. 17 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.
  • The mechanical, ultrasonic, and hydrologic properties of samples from the Grouse Canyon Member of the Belted Range Tuff exposed in the GTUF Heated Block Alcove, U12G Tunnel, Nevada Test Site are described. These results are similar to measurements made earlier at Sandia National Laboratories. 12 refs., 37 figs., 17 tabs.
  • This report summarizes the detailed geologic characterization of samples of bed-contact zones and surrounding nonwelded bedded tuffs, both within Tunnel Bed 5, that are exposed in the G-Tunnel complex beneath Rainier Mesa on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Original planning studies treated the bed-contact zones in Tunnel Bed 5 as simple planar surfaces of relatively high permeability. Detailed characterization, however, indicates that these zones have a finite thickness, are depositional in origin, vary considerably over short vertical and horizontal distances, and are internally complex. Fluid flow in a sequence of nonwelded zeolitized ash-flow or bedded tuffs and thin intervening reworkedmore » zones appears to be a porous-medium phenomenon, regardless of the presence of layering. There are no consistent differences in either bulk composition or detailed mineralogy between bedded tuffs and bed-contact zones in Tunnel Bed 5. Although the original bulk composition of Tunnel Bed 5 was probably peralkaline, extensive zeolitization has resulted in a present peraluminous bulk composition of both bedded tuffs and bed-contact zones. The major zeolite present, clinoptilolite, is intermediate (Ca:K:Na = 26:35:39) and effectively uniform in composition. This composition is similar to that of clinoptilolite from the tuffaceous beds of Calico Hills above the static water level in hole USW G-1, but somewhat different from that reported for zeolites from below the static water level in USW G-2. Tunnel Bed 5 also contains abundant hydrous manganese oxides. The similarity in composition of the clinoptilolites from Tunnel Bed 5 and those above the static water level at Yucca Mountain indicates that many of the results of nuclide-migration experiments in Tunnel Bed 5 would be transferrable to zeolitized nonwelded tuffs above the static water level at Yucca Mountain.« less