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Title: Para-methylstyrene from toluene and acetaldehyde

Abstract

High yields of para-methylstyrene (PMS) were obtained in this study by coupling toluene and acetaldehyde then cracking the resultant 1,1-ditolylethane (DTE) to give equimolar amounts of PMS and toluene. In the first step, a total DTE and ''trimer'' yield of 98% on toluene and 93% on acetaldehyde was obtained using 98% sulfuric acid as catalyst at 5-10/sup 0/C. In the second step, a choline chloride-offretite cracked DTE with 84.0% conversion and 91% selectivity to PMS and toluene. Additional PMS can be obtained by cracking the by-product ''trimer'' formed by coupling DTE and toluene with acetaldehyde. Zeolite Rho was as active but yielded less PMS (86%) and produced more para-ethyltoluene (PET), an undesirable by-product.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Gulf Research and Development Co., Pittsburgh, PA
OSTI Identifier:
5929056
Report Number(s):
CONF-840828-
Journal ID: CODEN: ACENC
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIChE Natl. Meet.; (United States); Journal Volume: 42 D; Conference: International synfuels policies and technologies symposium, Philadelphia, PA, USA, 19 Aug 1984
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; ACETALDEHYDE; CATALYTIC CRACKING; STYRENE; PRODUCTION; TOLUENE; CHEMICAL REACTION YIELD; ETHANE; SULFURIC ACID; ALDEHYDES; ALKANES; ALKYLATED AROMATICS; AROMATICS; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; CRACKING; DECOMPOSITION; HYDROCARBONS; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; INORGANIC ACIDS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; PYROLYSIS; THERMOCHEMICAL PROCESSES; YIELDS 020500* -- Petroleum-- Products & By-Products

Citation Formats

Innes, R.A., and Occelli, M.L.. Para-methylstyrene from toluene and acetaldehyde. United States: N. p., 1984. Web.
Innes, R.A., & Occelli, M.L.. Para-methylstyrene from toluene and acetaldehyde. United States.
Innes, R.A., and Occelli, M.L.. 1984. "Para-methylstyrene from toluene and acetaldehyde". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5929056,
title = {Para-methylstyrene from toluene and acetaldehyde},
author = {Innes, R.A. and Occelli, M.L.},
abstractNote = {High yields of para-methylstyrene (PMS) were obtained in this study by coupling toluene and acetaldehyde then cracking the resultant 1,1-ditolylethane (DTE) to give equimolar amounts of PMS and toluene. In the first step, a total DTE and ''trimer'' yield of 98% on toluene and 93% on acetaldehyde was obtained using 98% sulfuric acid as catalyst at 5-10/sup 0/C. In the second step, a choline chloride-offretite cracked DTE with 84.0% conversion and 91% selectivity to PMS and toluene. Additional PMS can be obtained by cracking the by-product ''trimer'' formed by coupling DTE and toluene with acetaldehyde. Zeolite Rho was as active but yielded less PMS (86%) and produced more para-ethyltoluene (PET), an undesirable by-product.},
doi = {},
journal = {AIChE Natl. Meet.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 42 D,
place = {United States},
year = 1984,
month = 8
}

Conference:
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