skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Primary radiation therapy for locally advanced breast cancer

Abstract

The optimal local-regional treatment for patients with Stage III breast cancer has not been determined. To evaluate the effectiveness of radiation therapy as local treatment for such patients, the results of 192 patients (five with bilateral disease) treated with radiation therapy without mastectomy between July 1, 1968 and December 31, 1981 were reviewed. Excisional biopsy (gross tumor removal) was performed in only 54 of the 197 breasts. Patients typically received 4500 to 5000 cGy in 5 weeks to the breast and draining lymph nodes; a local boost to areas of gross disease was delivered to 157 patients. Multi-agent chemotherapy was given to 53 patients. The median follow-up was 65 months. The actuarial probability of survival for the entire group was 41% at 5 years and 23% at 10 years. The probability of relapse-free survival (RFS) was 30% at 5 years and 19% at 10 years. The addition of multi-agent chemotherapy was associated with a significantly improved 5-year RFS (40% versus 26%, P = 0.02). The 5-year survival rate was 51% for patients who received adjuvant multi-agent chemotherapy and 38% for patients who did not (P = 0.16). The actuarial rate of local-regional tumor control (not censored for distant failure) formore » all patients was 73% at 5 years and 68% at ten years, and the crude incidence of local-regional control was 78%. Local-regional tumor control was principally influenced by radiation dose. Patients who received 6000 cGy or greater to the primary site had a better 5-year rate of control in the breast than did patients who received less than 6000 cGy (83% versus 70%, P = 0.06). Significant complications were seen in 15 patients (8%); these included moderate or severe arm edema in six patients and brachial plexopathy in four patients. Cosmetic results at last evaluation were excellent or good in 56% of evaluable patients, fair in 25%, and poor in 19%.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Joint Center for Radiation Therapy, Boston, MA
OSTI Identifier:
5901394
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Cancer (Philadelphia); (United States); Journal Volume: 60:6
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; LYMPH NODES; RADIATION DOSES; MAMMARY GLANDS; NEOPLASMS; COMBINED THERAPY; PATIENTS; RADIATION INJURIES; SURVIVAL CURVES; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; BIOLOGICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; BODY; DISEASES; DOSES; GLANDS; INJURIES; LYMPHATIC SYSTEM; ORGANS; RADIATION EFFECTS; THERAPY; 550603* - Medicine- External Radiation in Therapy- (1980-); 550600 - Medicine

Citation Formats

Sheldon, T., Hayes, D.F., Cady, B., Parker, L., Osteen, R., Silver, B., Recht, A., Come, S., Henderson, I.C., and Harris, J.R. Primary radiation therapy for locally advanced breast cancer. United States: N. p., 1987. Web. doi:10.1002/1097-0142(19870915)60:6<1219::AID-CNCR2820600610>3.0.CO;2-2.
Sheldon, T., Hayes, D.F., Cady, B., Parker, L., Osteen, R., Silver, B., Recht, A., Come, S., Henderson, I.C., & Harris, J.R. Primary radiation therapy for locally advanced breast cancer. United States. doi:10.1002/1097-0142(19870915)60:6<1219::AID-CNCR2820600610>3.0.CO;2-2.
Sheldon, T., Hayes, D.F., Cady, B., Parker, L., Osteen, R., Silver, B., Recht, A., Come, S., Henderson, I.C., and Harris, J.R. 1987. "Primary radiation therapy for locally advanced breast cancer". United States. doi:10.1002/1097-0142(19870915)60:6<1219::AID-CNCR2820600610>3.0.CO;2-2.
@article{osti_5901394,
title = {Primary radiation therapy for locally advanced breast cancer},
author = {Sheldon, T. and Hayes, D.F. and Cady, B. and Parker, L. and Osteen, R. and Silver, B. and Recht, A. and Come, S. and Henderson, I.C. and Harris, J.R.},
abstractNote = {The optimal local-regional treatment for patients with Stage III breast cancer has not been determined. To evaluate the effectiveness of radiation therapy as local treatment for such patients, the results of 192 patients (five with bilateral disease) treated with radiation therapy without mastectomy between July 1, 1968 and December 31, 1981 were reviewed. Excisional biopsy (gross tumor removal) was performed in only 54 of the 197 breasts. Patients typically received 4500 to 5000 cGy in 5 weeks to the breast and draining lymph nodes; a local boost to areas of gross disease was delivered to 157 patients. Multi-agent chemotherapy was given to 53 patients. The median follow-up was 65 months. The actuarial probability of survival for the entire group was 41% at 5 years and 23% at 10 years. The probability of relapse-free survival (RFS) was 30% at 5 years and 19% at 10 years. The addition of multi-agent chemotherapy was associated with a significantly improved 5-year RFS (40% versus 26%, P = 0.02). The 5-year survival rate was 51% for patients who received adjuvant multi-agent chemotherapy and 38% for patients who did not (P = 0.16). The actuarial rate of local-regional tumor control (not censored for distant failure) for all patients was 73% at 5 years and 68% at ten years, and the crude incidence of local-regional control was 78%. Local-regional tumor control was principally influenced by radiation dose. Patients who received 6000 cGy or greater to the primary site had a better 5-year rate of control in the breast than did patients who received less than 6000 cGy (83% versus 70%, P = 0.06). Significant complications were seen in 15 patients (8%); these included moderate or severe arm edema in six patients and brachial plexopathy in four patients. Cosmetic results at last evaluation were excellent or good in 56% of evaluable patients, fair in 25%, and poor in 19%.},
doi = {10.1002/1097-0142(19870915)60:6<1219::AID-CNCR2820600610>3.0.CO;2-2},
journal = {Cancer (Philadelphia); (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 60:6,
place = {United States},
year = 1987,
month = 9
}
  • A retrospective review of 137 patients with locally advanced breast cancer, but without distant metastases, who were treated with radical radiation therapy is presented. Ninety percent of patients had an initial complete response to their radiation therapy. The 5 year rates of local tumor control, survival free of distant failure, and overall survival were 54% 28% and 30%, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that the following features were associated with improved local tumor control: clinically negative axillary nodes, excisional biopsy, radiation dose greater than 6000 rad, and the use of adjuvant systemic therapy. Improved freedom from distant relapse was seen inmore » patients with small primaries and non-inflammatory carcinoma, as well as clinically negative axillary nodes, excisional biopsy, radiation dose greater than 6000 rad, and the use of adjuvant systemic therapy. The results suggest that adequate levels of radiation therapy can provide local tumor control in a significant proportion of patients with locally advanced breast cancer and that adjuvant systemic therapy is useful in improving both local tumor control and freedom from distant relapse in these patients.« less
  • Radiation theraoy should be fully used in the management of advanced breast cancer. Locally advanced primary or recurrent carcinoma, with limited extent, should be treated aggressively, aimed at permanent control. Palliative treatment of incurable or metastatic lesions relieves symptoms and improves patient's quality of survival. Some metastatic lesions involving vital structures may create emergencies. Prompt institution of radiation therapy may reverse the serious complication and save the patient's life.
  • Purpose: To assess the diagnostic performance of pretreatment {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT) and its impact on radiation therapy treatment decisions in patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC). Methods and Materials: Patients with LABC with Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status <2 and no contraindication to neoadjuvant chemotherapy, surgery, and adjuvant radiation therapy were enrolled on a prospective trial. All patients had pretreatment conventional imaging (CI) performed, including bilateral breast mammography and ultrasound, bone scan, and CT chest, abdomen, and pelvis scans performed. Informed consent was obtained before enrolment. Pretreatment whole-body {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scansmore » were performed on all patients, and results were compared with CI findings. Results: A total of 154 patients with LABC with no clinical or radiologic evidence of distant metastases on CI were enrolled. Median age was 49 years (range, 26-70 years). Imaging with PET/CT detected distant metastatic disease and/or locoregional disease not visualized on CI in 32 patients (20.8%). Distant metastatic disease was detected in 17 patients (11.0%): 6 had bony metastases, 5 had intrathoracic metastases (pulmonary/mediastinal), 2 had distant nodal metastases, 2 had liver metastases, 1 had pulmonary and bony metastases, and 1 had mediastinal and distant nodal metastases. Of the remaining 139 patients, nodal disease outside conventional radiation therapy fields was detected on PET/CT in 15 patients (10.8%), with involvement of ipsilateral internal mammary nodes in 13 and ipsilateral level 5 cervical nodes in 2. Conclusions: Imaging with PET/CT provides superior diagnostic and staging information in patients with LABC compared with CI, which has significant therapeutic implications with respect to radiation therapy management. Imaging with PET/CT should be considered in all patients undergoing primary staging for LABC.« less
  • Purpose: To analyze primary tumor (PT) and lymph node (LN) position changes relative to each other and relative to anatomic landmarks during conventionally fractionated radiation therapy for patients with locally advanced lung cancer. Methods and Materials: In 12 patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer PT, LN, carina, and 1 thoracic vertebra were manually contoured on weekly 4-dimensional fan-beam CT scans. Systematic and random interfraction displacements of all contoured structures were identified in the 3 cardinal directions, and resulting setup margins were calculated. Time trends and the effect of volume changes on displacements were analyzed. Results: Three-dimensional displacement vectorsmore » and systematic/random interfraction displacements were smaller for carina than for vertebra both for PT and LN. For PT, mean (SD) 3-dimensional displacement vectors with carina-based alignment were 7 (4) mm versus 9 (5) mm with bony anatomy (P<.0001). For LN, smaller displacements were found with carina- (5 [3] mm, P<.0001) and vertebra-based (6 [3] mm, P=.002) alignment compared with using PT for setup (8 [5] mm). Primary tumor and LN displacements relative to bone and carina were independent (P>.05). Displacements between PT and bone (P=.04) and between PT and LN (P=.01) were significantly correlated with PT volume regression. Displacements between LN and carina were correlated with LN volume change (P=.03). Conclusions: Carina-based setup results in a more reproducible PT and LN alignment than bony anatomy setup. Considering the independence of PT and LN displacement and the impact of volume regression on displacements over time, repeated CT imaging even with PT-based alignment is recommended in locally advanced disease.« less
  • Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) achieves excellent local control for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), but may increase late duodenal toxicity. Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivers intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a rotating gantry rather than multiple fixed beams. This study dosimetrically evaluates the feasibility of implementing duodenal constraints for SBRT using VMAT vs IMRT. Non–duodenal sparing (NS) and duodenal-sparing (DS) VMAT and IMRT plans delivering 25 Gy in 1 fraction were generated for 15 patients with LAPC. DS plans were constrained to duodenal D{sub max} of<30 Gy at any point. VMAT used 1 360° coplanar arc with 4° spacingmore » between control points, whereas IMRT used 9 coplanar beams with fixed gantry positions at 40° angles. Dosimetric parameters for target volumes and organs at risk were compared for DS planning vs NS planning and VMAT vs IMRT using paired-sample Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Both DS VMAT and DS IMRT achieved significantly reduced duodenal D{sub mean}, D{sub max}, D{sub 1cc}, D{sub 4%}, and V{sub 20} {sub Gy} compared with NS plans (all p≤0.002). DS constraints compromised target coverage for IMRT as demonstrated by reduced V{sub 95%} (p = 0.01) and D{sub mean} (p = 0.02), but not for VMAT. DS constraints resulted in increased dose to right kidney, spinal cord, stomach, and liver for VMAT. Direct comparison of DS VMAT and DS IMRT revealed that VMAT was superior in sparing the left kidney (p<0.001) and the spinal cord (p<0.001), whereas IMRT was superior in sparing the stomach (p = 0.05) and the liver (p = 0.003). DS VMAT required 21% fewer monitor units (p<0.001) and delivered treatment 2.4 minutes faster (p<0.001) than DS IMRT. Implementing DS constraints during SBRT planning for LAPC can significantly reduce duodenal point or volumetric dose parameters for both VMAT and IMRT. The primary consequence of implementing DS constraints for VMAT is increased dose to other organs at risk, whereas for IMRT it is compromised target coverage. These findings suggest clinical situations where each technique may be most useful if DS constraints are to be employed.« less