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Title: Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 85-307-1608, Frances Perkins Building, Washington, DC

Abstract

Environmental and breathing-zone samples were analyzed for carbon dioxide and carbon-monoxide at the Frances Perkins Building, Washington, DC in May, 1985. The evaluation was requested by the employees who were concerned about the possible lack of fresh air and potential CO contamination in their offices from indoor parking garages and the nearby Interstate 395 tunnel. Ventilation specifications of the building were reviewed. The author concludes that there is no hazard from lack of fresh air or CO in the building. The author recommends monitoring indoor CO, especially during periods of stagnant weather during the summer months and adjusting the ventilation system to minimize CO concentrations if necessary.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, OH (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
5885166
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 5885166
Report Number(s):
PB-86-145364/XAB; HETA-85-307-1608
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; HAZARDOUS MATERIALS; INDOOR AIR POLLUTION; OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY; OFFICE BUILDINGS; VENTILATION; CARBON DIOXIDE; CARBON MONOXIDE; INDUSTRIAL MEDICINE; INSPECTION; TOXICITY; AIR POLLUTION; BUILDINGS; CARBON COMPOUNDS; CARBON OXIDES; CHALCOGENIDES; MATERIALS; MEDICINE; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; POLLUTION; SAFETY 500200* -- Environment, Atmospheric-- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport-- (-1989); 552000 -- Public Health

Citation Formats

Lee, S.A. Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 85-307-1608, Frances Perkins Building, Washington, DC. United States: N. p., 1985. Web.
Lee, S.A. Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 85-307-1608, Frances Perkins Building, Washington, DC. United States.
Lee, S.A. Mon . "Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 85-307-1608, Frances Perkins Building, Washington, DC". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5885166,
title = {Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 85-307-1608, Frances Perkins Building, Washington, DC},
author = {Lee, S.A.},
abstractNote = {Environmental and breathing-zone samples were analyzed for carbon dioxide and carbon-monoxide at the Frances Perkins Building, Washington, DC in May, 1985. The evaluation was requested by the employees who were concerned about the possible lack of fresh air and potential CO contamination in their offices from indoor parking garages and the nearby Interstate 395 tunnel. Ventilation specifications of the building were reviewed. The author concludes that there is no hazard from lack of fresh air or CO in the building. The author recommends monitoring indoor CO, especially during periods of stagnant weather during the summer months and adjusting the ventilation system to minimize CO concentrations if necessary.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 1985},
month = {Mon Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 1985}
}

Technical Report:
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