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Title: Blood-brain barrier transport of cationized immunoglobulin G: Enhanced delivery compared to native protein

Abstract

IgG molecules are potential neuropharmaceuticals that may be used for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes. However, IgG molecules are excluded from entering brain, owing to a lack of transport of these plasma proteins through the brain capillary wall, or blood-brain barrier (BBB). The possibility of enhanced IgG delivery through the BBB by cationization of the proteins was explored in the present studies. Native bovine IgG molecules were cationized by covalent coupling of hexamethylenediamine and the isoelectric point was raised to greater than 10.7 based on isoelectric focusing studies. Native and cationized IgG molecules were radiolabeled with /sup 125/I and chloramine T. Cationized IgG, but not native IgG, was rapidly taken up by isolated bovine brain microvessels, which were used as an in vitro model system of the BBB. Cationized IgG binding was time and temperature dependent and was saturated by increasing concentrations of unlabeled cationized IgG (dissociation constant of the high-affinity binding site, 0.90 +/- 0.37 microM; Bmax, 1.4 +/- 0.4 nmol per mg of protein). In vivo studies documented enhanced brain uptake of 125I-labeled cationized IgG relative to (3H)albumin, and complete transcytosis of the 125I-labeled cationized IgG molecule through the BBB and into brain parenchyma was demonstrated by thaw-mount autoradiographymore » of frozen sections of rat brain obtained after carotid arterial infusions of 125I-labeled cationized IgG. These studies demonstrate that cationization of IgG molecules greatly facilitates the transport of these plasma proteins through the BBB in vivo, and this process may provide a new strategy for IgG delivery through the BBB.« less

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of California, Los Angeles (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
5879199
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA; (United States); Journal Volume: 86:12
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER; PERMEABILITY; IMMUNOGLOBULINS; MEMBRANE TRANSPORT; ALBUMINS; BIOCHEMICAL REACTION KINETICS; BRAIN; CAPILLARIES; CATIONS; CATTLE; IN VITRO; IODINE 132; RATS; SPECIFICITY; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE; TIME DEPENDENCE; TRITIUM COMPOUNDS; ANIMALS; BETA DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; BETA-MINUS DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; BLOOD VESSELS; BODY; CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM; CHARGED PARTICLES; DOMESTIC ANIMALS; GLOBULINS; HOURS LIVING RADIOISOTOPES; INTERMEDIATE MASS NUCLEI; IODINE ISOTOPES; IONS; ISOTOPES; KINETICS; LABELLED COMPOUNDS; MAMMALS; NERVOUS SYSTEM; NUCLEI; ODD-ODD NUCLEI; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANS; PROTEINS; RADIOISOTOPES; REACTION KINETICS; RODENTS; RUMINANTS; VERTEBRATES; 550201* - Biochemistry- Tracer Techniques

Citation Formats

Triguero, D., Buciak, J.B., Yang, J., and Pardridge, W.M. Blood-brain barrier transport of cationized immunoglobulin G: Enhanced delivery compared to native protein. United States: N. p., 1989. Web. doi:10.1073/pnas.86.12.4761.
Triguero, D., Buciak, J.B., Yang, J., & Pardridge, W.M. Blood-brain barrier transport of cationized immunoglobulin G: Enhanced delivery compared to native protein. United States. doi:10.1073/pnas.86.12.4761.
Triguero, D., Buciak, J.B., Yang, J., and Pardridge, W.M. Thu . "Blood-brain barrier transport of cationized immunoglobulin G: Enhanced delivery compared to native protein". United States. doi:10.1073/pnas.86.12.4761.
@article{osti_5879199,
title = {Blood-brain barrier transport of cationized immunoglobulin G: Enhanced delivery compared to native protein},
author = {Triguero, D. and Buciak, J.B. and Yang, J. and Pardridge, W.M.},
abstractNote = {IgG molecules are potential neuropharmaceuticals that may be used for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes. However, IgG molecules are excluded from entering brain, owing to a lack of transport of these plasma proteins through the brain capillary wall, or blood-brain barrier (BBB). The possibility of enhanced IgG delivery through the BBB by cationization of the proteins was explored in the present studies. Native bovine IgG molecules were cationized by covalent coupling of hexamethylenediamine and the isoelectric point was raised to greater than 10.7 based on isoelectric focusing studies. Native and cationized IgG molecules were radiolabeled with /sup 125/I and chloramine T. Cationized IgG, but not native IgG, was rapidly taken up by isolated bovine brain microvessels, which were used as an in vitro model system of the BBB. Cationized IgG binding was time and temperature dependent and was saturated by increasing concentrations of unlabeled cationized IgG (dissociation constant of the high-affinity binding site, 0.90 +/- 0.37 microM; Bmax, 1.4 +/- 0.4 nmol per mg of protein). In vivo studies documented enhanced brain uptake of 125I-labeled cationized IgG relative to (3H)albumin, and complete transcytosis of the 125I-labeled cationized IgG molecule through the BBB and into brain parenchyma was demonstrated by thaw-mount autoradiography of frozen sections of rat brain obtained after carotid arterial infusions of 125I-labeled cationized IgG. These studies demonstrate that cationization of IgG molecules greatly facilitates the transport of these plasma proteins through the BBB in vivo, and this process may provide a new strategy for IgG delivery through the BBB.},
doi = {10.1073/pnas.86.12.4761},
journal = {Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 86:12,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 1989},
month = {Thu Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 1989}
}
  • Cationized albumin (pI greater than 8), unlike native albumin (pI approximately 4), enters cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rapidly from blood. This suggests that a specific uptake mechanism for cationized albumin may exist at the brain capillary wall, i.e. the blood-brain barrier. Isolated bovine brain capillaries rapidly bound cationized (/sup 3/H)albumin and approximately 70% of the bound radioactivity was resistant to mild acid wash, which is assumed to represent internalized peptide. Binding was saturable and a Scatchard plot gave a maximal binding capacity (Ro) = 5.5 +/- 0.7 micrograms/mgp (79 +/- 10 pmol/mgp), and a half-saturation constant (KD) = 55 +/- 8more » micrograms/ml (0.8 +/- 0.1 microM). The binding of cationized (/sup 3/H)albumin (pI = 8.5-9) was inhibited by protamine, protamine sulfate, and polylysine (molecular weight = 70,000) with a Ki of approximately 3 micrograms/ml for all three proteins. The use of cationized albumin in directed delivery of peptides through the blood-brain barrier was examined by coupling (/sup 3/H)beta-endorphin to unlabeled cationized albumin (pI = 8.5-9) using the bifunctional reagent, N-succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio)proprionate. The (/sup 3/H)beta-endorphin-cationized albumin chimeric peptide was rapidly bound and endocytosed by isolated bovine brain capillaries, and this was inhibited by unlabeled cationized albumin but not by unconjugated beta-endorphin or native bovine albumin. Cationized albumin provides a new tool for studying absorptive-mediated endocytosis at the brain capillary and may also provide a vehicle for directed drug delivery through the blood-brain barrier.« less
  • Cationization of proteins in general enhances the cellular uptake of these macromolecules, and cationized antibodies are known to retain antigen binding properties. Therefore, cationized antibodies may be therapeutic and allow for intracellular immunization. The present studies test the hypothesis that the tissue uptake of cationized immunoglobulin G (IgG) after intravenous administration may be greatly increased relative to the uptake of native proteins. The pharmacokinetics of cationized immunoglobulin G clearance from blood, and the volume of distribution of the cationized or native protein (albumin, IgG) for 10 organs was measured both in anesthetized rats and in an anesthetized adult Macaca irusmore » cynomologous monkey. Initial studies on brain showed that serum factors inhibited uptake of 125I-cationized IgG, but not 3H-cationized IgG. The blood-brain barrier permeability surface area product for 3H-cationized IgG was 0.57 {plus minus} 0.04 microliters min-1 g-1. The ratio of the volume of distribution of the 3-H-cationized IgG compared to 3H-labeled native albumin ranged from 0.9 (testis) to 15.7 (spleen) in the rat at 3 hr after injection, and a similarly enhanced organ uptake was observed in the primate. In conclusion, these studies demonstrate that cationization of immunoglobulin greatly increases organ uptake of the plasma protein compared to native immunoglobulins, and suggest that cationization of monoclonal antibodies may represent a potential new strategy for enhancing the intracellular delivery of these proteins.« less
  • The role of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in the transport of thyroxine was examined in mice. Radioiodinated (hot thyroxine (hT/sub 4/) administered icv had a half-time disappearance from the brain of 30 min. This increased to 60 min (p < 0.001) when administered with 211 pmole/mouse of unlabeled (cold) thyroxine (cT/sub 4/). The Km for this inhibition of hT/sub 4/ transport out of the brain by cT/sub 4/ was 9.66 pmole/brain. Unlabeled 3,3',5 triiodothyronine (cT/sub 3/) was unable to inhibit transport of hT/sub 4/ out of the brain, although both cT/sub 3/ (p < 0.05) and cT/sub 4/ (p <more » 0.05) did inhibit transport of radioiodinated 3,3',5 triiodothyronine (hT/sub 3/) to a small degree. Entry of hT/sub 4/ into the brain after peripheral administration was negligible and was not affected by either cT/sub 4/ nor cT/sub 3/. By contrast, the entry of hT/sub 3/ into the brain after peripheral administration was inhibited by cT/sub 3/ (p < 0.001) and was increased by cT/sub 4/ (p < 0.01). The levels of the unlabeled thyroid hormones administered centrally in these studies did not affect bulk flow, as assessed by labeled red blood cells (/sup 99m/Tc-RBC), or the carrier mediated transport of iodide out of the brain. Likewise, the vascular space of the brain and body, as assessed by /sup 99m/Tc-RBC, was unchanged by the levels of peripherally administered unlabeled thyroid hormones. Therefore, the results of these studies are not due to generalized effects of thyroid hormones on BBB transport. The results indicate that in the mouse the major carrier-mediated system for thyroxine in the BBB transports thyroxine out of the brain, while the major system for triiodothyronine transports hormone into the brain. 14 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.« less
  • Sodium borocaptate (Na{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 11}SH or BSH) has been used clinically for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of patients with primary brain tumors. The purpose of the present study was to determine if tumor uptake of BSH and efficacy of BNCT could be enhanced in F98 glioma-bearing rats by intracarotid (i.c.) injection of the compound with or without blood-brain barrier disruption (BBB-D). 56 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.
  • Results of initial clinical trials of brain tumor chemotherapy after osmotic blood-brain barrier disruption are promising. In general, the procedure is well tolerated. The major complication has been seizures. In this report, data are presented which indicate that the etiology of these seizures is related to the use of contrast agent (meglumine iothalamate) to monitor barrier modification. A series of 19 patients underwent a total of 85 barrier modification procedures. Documentation of barrier disruption was monitored by contrast-enhanced computed tomographic (CT) scanning, radionuclide brain scanning, or a combination of both techniques. In 56 procedures (19 patients) monitored by enhanced CT,more » seizures occurred a total of 10 times in eight patients. Twenty-three barrier modification procedures (in nine of these 19 patients) documented by nuclear brain scans alone, however, resulted in only one focal motor seizure in each of two patients. In eight of the 19 patients who had seizures after barrier disruption and enhanced CT scan, four subsequently had repeat procedures monitored by radionuclide scan alone. In only one of these patients was further seizure activity noted; a single focal motor seizure was observed. Clearly, the radionuclide brain scan does not have the sensitivity and spatial resolution of enhanced CT, but at present it appears safer to monitor barrier modification by this method and to follow tumor growth between barrier modifications by enhanced CT. Four illustrative cases showing methods, problems, and promising results are presented.« less