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Title: Uranium and plutonium isotopes in the atmosphere

Abstract

Uranium 234 and 235 were found to be highly enriched relative to uranium 238 in several rain samples collected at Fayetteville, Arkansas, during the months of April and May 1980. The anomalous uranium appears to have originated from the Soviet satellite Cosmos-954, which fell over Canada on January 24, 1978. The uranium fallout occurred just about the time Mount St. Helens erupted on May 18, 1980. The concentration of /sup 238/U in rain increased markedly after the eruption of Mount St. Helens, and it appeared as if a large quantity of natural uranium was injected into the atmosphere by the volcanic eruption. The pattern of variation of the concentrations of uranium in rain after the eruption of Mount St. Helens was found to be similar to that of plutonium isotopes.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Department of Chemistry, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701
OSTI Identifier:
5860944
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: J. Geophys. Res.; (United States); Journal Volume: 88:C6
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ARKANSAS; RADIOACTIVITY; URANIUM 234; RADIOECOLOGICAL CONCENTRATION; URANIUM 235; URANIUM 238; FALLOUT; ISOTOPE RATIO; MT ST HELENS; PRECIPITATION SCAVENGING; RAIN; SATELLITES; SURFACE AIR; ACTINIDE ISOTOPES; ACTINIDE NUCLEI; AIR; ALPHA DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; ATMOSPHERIC PRECIPITATIONS; CASCADE MOUNTAINS; ECOLOGICAL CONCENTRATION; EVEN-EVEN NUCLEI; EVEN-ODD NUCLEI; FEDERAL REGION VI; FEDERAL REGION X; FLUIDS; GASES; HEAVY NUCLEI; ISOMERIC TRANSITION ISOTOPES; ISOTOPES; MINUTES LIVING RADIOISOTOPES; MOUNTAINS; NORTH AMERICA; NUCLEI; RADIOISOTOPES; SEPARATION PROCESSES; URANIUM ISOTOPES; USA; WASHINGTON; YEARS LIVING RADIOISOTOPES; 500300* - Environment, Atmospheric- Radioactive Materials Monitoring & Transport- (-1989)

Citation Formats

Sakuragi, Y., Meason, J.L., and Kuroda, P.K. Uranium and plutonium isotopes in the atmosphere. United States: N. p., 1983. Web. doi:10.1029/JC088iC06p03718.
Sakuragi, Y., Meason, J.L., & Kuroda, P.K. Uranium and plutonium isotopes in the atmosphere. United States. doi:10.1029/JC088iC06p03718.
Sakuragi, Y., Meason, J.L., and Kuroda, P.K. Wed . "Uranium and plutonium isotopes in the atmosphere". United States. doi:10.1029/JC088iC06p03718.
@article{osti_5860944,
title = {Uranium and plutonium isotopes in the atmosphere},
author = {Sakuragi, Y. and Meason, J.L. and Kuroda, P.K.},
abstractNote = {Uranium 234 and 235 were found to be highly enriched relative to uranium 238 in several rain samples collected at Fayetteville, Arkansas, during the months of April and May 1980. The anomalous uranium appears to have originated from the Soviet satellite Cosmos-954, which fell over Canada on January 24, 1978. The uranium fallout occurred just about the time Mount St. Helens erupted on May 18, 1980. The concentration of /sup 238/U in rain increased markedly after the eruption of Mount St. Helens, and it appeared as if a large quantity of natural uranium was injected into the atmosphere by the volcanic eruption. The pattern of variation of the concentrations of uranium in rain after the eruption of Mount St. Helens was found to be similar to that of plutonium isotopes.},
doi = {10.1029/JC088iC06p03718},
journal = {J. Geophys. Res.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 88:C6,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Apr 20 00:00:00 EST 1983},
month = {Wed Apr 20 00:00:00 EST 1983}
}