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Title: Potential production of energy cane for fuel in the Caribbean

Abstract

Sugarcane grown as energy cane presents a new potential to the Caribbean countries to provide their own energy needs and to reduce or eliminate fuel oil imports. The use of proper agronomic techniques can convert conventional sugarcane growing to a crop capable of giving energy feedstocks in the form of fiber for boiler fuel for electricity and fermentable solids for alcohol for motor fuel. Sugarcane can still be obtained from the energy cane for domestic consumption and export if desired. The aerable land now devoted to sugarcane can utilized for energy-cane production without causing any serious imbalance in food crop production.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5856699
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 5856699
Report Number(s):
CONF-840828-
Journal ID: CODEN: ACENC
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIChE Natl. Meet.; (United States); Journal Volume: 86; Conference: International synfuels policies and technologies symposium, Philadelphia, PA, USA, 19 Aug 1984
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 09 BIOMASS FUELS; DEVELOPING COUNTRIES; ENERGY SOURCE DEVELOPMENT; FUEL SUBSTITUTION; SUGAR CANE; PRODUCTION; ALCOHOL FUELS; BOILER FUELS; CARIBBEAN SEA; ATLANTIC OCEAN; FUELS; GRASS; PLANTS; SEAS; SURFACE WATERS; SYNTHETIC FUELS 295000* -- Energy Planning & Policy-- Hydrogen & Synthetic Fuels; 299003 -- Energy Planning & Policy-- Unconventional Sources & Power Generation-- Other-- (-1989); 140504 -- Solar Energy Conversion-- Biomass Production & Conversion-- (-1989)

Citation Formats

Samuels, G. Potential production of energy cane for fuel in the Caribbean. United States: N. p., 1984. Web.
Samuels, G. Potential production of energy cane for fuel in the Caribbean. United States.
Samuels, G. Wed . "Potential production of energy cane for fuel in the Caribbean". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5856699,
title = {Potential production of energy cane for fuel in the Caribbean},
author = {Samuels, G.},
abstractNote = {Sugarcane grown as energy cane presents a new potential to the Caribbean countries to provide their own energy needs and to reduce or eliminate fuel oil imports. The use of proper agronomic techniques can convert conventional sugarcane growing to a crop capable of giving energy feedstocks in the form of fiber for boiler fuel for electricity and fermentable solids for alcohol for motor fuel. Sugarcane can still be obtained from the energy cane for domestic consumption and export if desired. The aerable land now devoted to sugarcane can utilized for energy-cane production without causing any serious imbalance in food crop production.},
doi = {},
journal = {AIChE Natl. Meet.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 86,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 1984},
month = {Wed Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 1984}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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  • Sugarcane presents a tremendous potential as a renewable energy source for the non-oil producing countries of the Caribbean. The energy cane concept is sugarcane managed for maximum dry matter (total fermentable solids for alcohol fuel and combustible solids for electricity) rather than sucrose. The use of sugarcane as a renewable energy source can provide a solution, either partial or total, to the Caribbean energy problem. Sugar cane production and the use of this crop as a renewable energy source are described.
  • Sugar cane presents tremendous potential as a renewable energy source for the non-oil-producing, developing countries of the Caribbean basin. The analysis presented here, finds the overall energy balance to be extremely favorable. The economics are also favorable, even though capital investment requirements are high. Potential for improvement, in both the energy balance and the economic aspects, is very great. Such improvement is attainable by the development of new technology, which could be available in the short term and at moderate cost. (Refs. 8).
  • The Caribbean countries have traditionally grown sugar cane, coffee and bananas as major agriculture export crops. Food crop production was sufficient in most cases for domestic consumption. In recent years powerful social and economic changes of increasing population, industrial development and higher living standards have placed pressure on local governments to provide food, clothing, shelter and energy. Energy that is mainly supplied by imported oil. Biomass, primarily as sugar cane, can provide a solution, either partial or total, to the problem. Unfortunately, the arable land area for the majority of the countries is limited. Food crop production is needed formore » local consumption and export. Possible energy crop production to provide local needs will place an increasing demand on arable land. The objective of this paper is to present the scope of food versus energy crop production and a suggested renewable energy crop program to help achieve a balance within the limited land resources of the Caribbean.« less
  • A preliminary study, involving the evaluation of a new revolutionary process for preparation of sugar cane and separation of its components is presented. The primary objective of the study was to determine whether this cane separation process, and the equipment involved therein, had substantial merit for greater utilization of biomass for production of fuel and energy and specifically the ''Fuels from Sugar Crops'' program, including sugar cane, sweet sorghum, and other plant stalks. The report describes the historical background of the development of this process from 1964 to the present time; potential advantages of the process to the sugar industrymore » and to the DOE Program on ''Fuels from Sugar Crops''; the technical status of the process at the present time; marketing and research efforts now underway; and an evaluation of the prospects of success in perfecting the process and of its being economically sound. Comments are included on the physical structure of the sugar cane stalk and its components which render this process particularly applicable to this plant and related plants. Comments are also given on present sugar cane processing methods and the quality of the bagasse residue resulting from these methods as compared to the quality of the three solid components; namely, pith, rind fiber, and epidermis which result from the cane separation process. Specific recommendations are given for both short-term action and long-term actions relative to further studies to determine the full potential for this process and its possible contribution to the success of the DOE ''Fuels from Sugar Crops'' program.« less