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Title: Report of the HEPAP subpanel on major detectors in non-accelerator particle physics

Abstract

The subpanel on Major Detectors in Non-Accelerator Particle Physics was formed in February 1989 as the result of a letter from Robert Hunter, Director, Office of Energy Research, to Francis Low, Chairman of HEPAP. A copy of the letter is included in the Appendix to this report. The letter referred to the previous report of HEPAP Subpanel on High Energy Gamma Ray and Neutrino Astronomy which had found that several groups of scientists were working on promising new ideas and proposals in non-accelerator high energy physics and astrophysics; this report recommended that panel be formed to evaluate large projects in these areas of science when specific proposals were received by the funding agencies. In concurring with the recommendation, the request to establish this new Subpanel included the following specific charge: Within the context of changing world wide high energy physics activities and opportunities, review as necessary and evaluate the following major research proposals which have been submitted to the Department of Energy and/or to the National Science foundation: DUMAND II, GRANDE, and the Fly's Eye Upgrade.

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Department of Energy, Washington, DC (USA). Div. of High Energy Physics
OSTI Identifier:
5818166
Report Number(s):
DOE/ER-0413
ON: DE89013876
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Paper copy only, copy does not permit microfiche production
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; DUMAND PROJECT; GAMMA DETECTION; NEUTRINO DETECTION; ASTROPHYSICS; GAMMA ASTRONOMY; ASTRONOMY; DETECTION; RADIATION DETECTION 440104* -- Radiation Instrumentation-- High Energy Physics Instrumentation

Citation Formats

Not Available. Report of the HEPAP subpanel on major detectors in non-accelerator particle physics. United States: N. p., 1989. Web.
Not Available. Report of the HEPAP subpanel on major detectors in non-accelerator particle physics. United States.
Not Available. 1989. "Report of the HEPAP subpanel on major detectors in non-accelerator particle physics". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5818166,
title = {Report of the HEPAP subpanel on major detectors in non-accelerator particle physics},
author = {Not Available},
abstractNote = {The subpanel on Major Detectors in Non-Accelerator Particle Physics was formed in February 1989 as the result of a letter from Robert Hunter, Director, Office of Energy Research, to Francis Low, Chairman of HEPAP. A copy of the letter is included in the Appendix to this report. The letter referred to the previous report of HEPAP Subpanel on High Energy Gamma Ray and Neutrino Astronomy which had found that several groups of scientists were working on promising new ideas and proposals in non-accelerator high energy physics and astrophysics; this report recommended that panel be formed to evaluate large projects in these areas of science when specific proposals were received by the funding agencies. In concurring with the recommendation, the request to establish this new Subpanel included the following specific charge: Within the context of changing world wide high energy physics activities and opportunities, review as necessary and evaluate the following major research proposals which have been submitted to the Department of Energy and/or to the National Science foundation: DUMAND II, GRANDE, and the Fly's Eye Upgrade.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1989,
month = 5
}

Technical Report:
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