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Title: LAS homolog distribution shift during wastewater treatment and composting ecological implications

Abstract

The behavior of LAS (linear alkylbenzene sulfonate) in different environmental compartments was studied through wastewater treatment process steps in sewage treatment plants of Alicante and Benidorm (activated sludge type) as well as in Guardamar (lagoons). The fate of LAS, using a specific HPLC method, was monitored during treatment sludge compostage and soil amendment operations. Finally, the marine sediments close to a submarine wastewater sewer outfall were analyzed. The results show significant differences between distribution of LAS homologs in water and solids (sludges, sediments, and soils), as compared to the original distribution in detergent formulations, yielding a lower LAS average molecular weight in water samples. The change observed in the homolog distribution of LAS implies a reduction in the toxicity to Daphnia, because a lower average molecular weight of LAS is less toxic.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]; ;  [2]
  1. (Univ. of Alicante (Spain). Div. Chemical Engineering)
  2. (Petresa, Madrid (Spain))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5815812
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry; (United States); Journal Volume: 12:9
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; ABS; MONITORING; TOXICITY; SOILS; CONTAMINATION; SPAIN; WATER POLLUTION; WASTE WATER; ACTIVATED SLUDGE PROCESS; COMPOSTING; DAPHNIA; ANIMALS; AQUATIC ORGANISMS; ARTHROPODS; BRANCHIOPODS; CRUSTACEANS; DEVELOPING COUNTRIES; ESTERS; EUROPE; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; INVERTEBRATES; LIQUID WASTES; MANAGEMENT; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC SULFUR COMPOUNDS; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; POLLUTION; PROCESSING; SULFONIC ACID ESTERS; WASTE MANAGEMENT; WASTE PROCESSING; WASTES; WATER; WESTERN EUROPE; 540320* - Environment, Aquatic- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport- (1990-); 540220 - Environment, Terrestrial- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport- (1990-); 560300 - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology

Citation Formats

Prats, D., Ruiz, F., Vazquez, B., Zarzo, D., Berna, J.L., and Moreno, A. LAS homolog distribution shift during wastewater treatment and composting ecological implications. United States: N. p., 1993. Web. doi:10.1002/etc.5620120908.
Prats, D., Ruiz, F., Vazquez, B., Zarzo, D., Berna, J.L., & Moreno, A. LAS homolog distribution shift during wastewater treatment and composting ecological implications. United States. doi:10.1002/etc.5620120908.
Prats, D., Ruiz, F., Vazquez, B., Zarzo, D., Berna, J.L., and Moreno, A. 1993. "LAS homolog distribution shift during wastewater treatment and composting ecological implications". United States. doi:10.1002/etc.5620120908.
@article{osti_5815812,
title = {LAS homolog distribution shift during wastewater treatment and composting ecological implications},
author = {Prats, D. and Ruiz, F. and Vazquez, B. and Zarzo, D. and Berna, J.L. and Moreno, A.},
abstractNote = {The behavior of LAS (linear alkylbenzene sulfonate) in different environmental compartments was studied through wastewater treatment process steps in sewage treatment plants of Alicante and Benidorm (activated sludge type) as well as in Guardamar (lagoons). The fate of LAS, using a specific HPLC method, was monitored during treatment sludge compostage and soil amendment operations. Finally, the marine sediments close to a submarine wastewater sewer outfall were analyzed. The results show significant differences between distribution of LAS homologs in water and solids (sludges, sediments, and soils), as compared to the original distribution in detergent formulations, yielding a lower LAS average molecular weight in water samples. The change observed in the homolog distribution of LAS implies a reduction in the toxicity to Daphnia, because a lower average molecular weight of LAS is less toxic.},
doi = {10.1002/etc.5620120908},
journal = {Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 12:9,
place = {United States},
year = 1993,
month = 9
}
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