skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Magnetic resonance imaging of the central nervous system

Abstract

This text provides an introduction to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of disorders of the central nervous system, spine, neck, and nasopharynx. The book offers guidance in performing and interpreting MRI studies for specific clinical problems. Included are more than 800 images showing pathologic findings for various disorders and demonstrating how abnormalities detected in MRI scans can aid both in differential diagnosis and in clinical staging. The book summarizes the basic principles of MRI and describes the major equipment components and contrast agents. A review of the principles and potential applications of magnetic resonance spectroscopy is also included.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5780747
Resource Type:
Book
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM; IMAGE PROCESSING; NMR IMAGING; DIAGNOSTIC USES; PATTERN RECOGNITION; REVIEWS; CONGENITAL MALFORMATIONS; CORRELATIONS; DISEASES; ERRORS; NECK; NEUROLOGY; NOSE; PATHOLOGY; PHARYNX; PHYSIOLOGY; RADIOLOGICAL PERSONNEL; SURGERY; VERTEBRAE; BODY; BODY AREAS; DIAGNOSTIC TECHNIQUES; DIGESTIVE SYSTEM; DOCUMENT TYPES; FACE; HEAD; MALFORMATIONS; MEDICAL PERSONNEL; MEDICINE; NERVOUS SYSTEM; ORGANS; PATHOLOGICAL CHANGES; PERSONNEL; PROCESSING; RESPIRATORY SYSTEM; SKELETON; USES; 550602* - Medicine- External Radiation in Diagnostics- (1980-)

Citation Formats

Brant-Zawadzki, M., and Norman, D.. Magnetic resonance imaging of the central nervous system. United States: N. p., 1987. Web.
Brant-Zawadzki, M., & Norman, D.. Magnetic resonance imaging of the central nervous system. United States.
Brant-Zawadzki, M., and Norman, D.. Thu . "Magnetic resonance imaging of the central nervous system". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5780747,
title = {Magnetic resonance imaging of the central nervous system},
author = {Brant-Zawadzki, M. and Norman, D.},
abstractNote = {This text provides an introduction to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of disorders of the central nervous system, spine, neck, and nasopharynx. The book offers guidance in performing and interpreting MRI studies for specific clinical problems. Included are more than 800 images showing pathologic findings for various disorders and demonstrating how abnormalities detected in MRI scans can aid both in differential diagnosis and in clinical staging. The book summarizes the basic principles of MRI and describes the major equipment components and contrast agents. A review of the principles and potential applications of magnetic resonance spectroscopy is also included.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1987},
month = {Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1987}
}

Book:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this book.

Save / Share:
  • Organized according to disease type for use in the clinical setting, the book discusses all the major CNS infections and inflammations whose diagnosis is facilitated by imaging techniques. Enhanced by over 150 high-quality illustrations, the text details the pathologic findings using various imaging modalities and correlates these findings with clinical signs and basic neuropathology. The author examines the implications of various abnormalities seen on images, stressing their importance in diagnosis, prognosis, and assessment of response to treatment.
  • This book provides an introduction to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of disorders of the central nervous system, spine, neck, and nasopharynx. The book provides guidance in performing and interpreting MRI studies for specific clinical problems. Images showing pathologic findings for various disorders and demonstrating how abnormalities detected in MRI scans can aid both in differential diagnosis and clinical staging are shown. The book summarizes the basic principles of MRI and describes equipment components and contrast agents. Explanations of common artifacts and pitfalls in image interpretation and of pathophysiologic correlates of signal alterations in magnetic resonance imaging are given. A reviewmore » of the principles and potential applications of magnetic resonance spectroscopy is also included.« less
  • This book presents the papers on technological advancement and diagnostic uses g magnetic resonance imaging. A comparative evaluation with computerized tomography is presented. Topics covered are imaging principles g magnetic resonance;instrumentation of magnetic resonance (MR);pathophysiology;quality and limitations g images;NMR imaging of brain and spinal cord;MR spectroscopy and its applications;neuroanatomy;Congenital malformations of brain and MR imaging;planning g MR imaging of spine and head and neck imaging.
  • This report reviews the current applications of magnetic resonance imaging of the central nervous system. Since its introduction into the clinical environment in the early 1980's, this technology has had a major impact on the practice of neurology. It has proved to be superior to computed tomography for imaging many diseases of the brain and spine. In some instances it has clearly replaced computed tomography. It is likely that it will replace myelography for the assessment of cervicomedullary junction and spinal regions. The magnetic field strengths currently used appear to be entirely safe for clinical application in neurology except inmore » patients with cardiac pacemakers or vascular metallic clips. Some shortcomings of magnetic resonance imaging include its expense, the time required for scanning, and poor visualization of cortical bone.« less
  • Neurologic and neuropsychologic treatment related sequelae are increasingly encountered in children with cancer, but conventional means of neurologic investigation are insensitive to the presence and extent of damage. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has shown brain damage not demonstrable by other means of investigation. For this reason, 11 children with cancer and with nontumor-related neurologic dysfunction were studied on a 1.5 Tesla MRI unit. All had concurrent computed tomography (CT). MRI abnormalities were seen in all (100%) patients. In 10 of 11 patients, abnormalities were of greater extent on MRI than on CT. White matter changes were frequently seen on MRImore » without corresponding CT abnormality. Those patients with the most severe forms of neurologic compromise had the most extensive changes on MRI. Focal neurologic findings correlated well with regions of focal signal change. Milder forms of neurologic compromise occurred in patients with definite, but less extensive, periventricular and/or subcortical change on MRI. MRI is more sensitive than CT in demonstrating treatment-related neurologic damage in children with cancer, and the type of change seen on MRI seems to correlate well with the type and severity of neurologic dysfunction present.« less