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Title: Defense high-level waste and spent fuel characterization for geologic waste repositories

Abstract

Results of SANDIA-ORIGEN calculations are given for the total thermal output and radionuclide content, up to 100,000 years decay time, for defense high-level waste expected from the Savannah River Plant, the Hanford Reservation and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and for one pressurized water reactor and five boiling water reactor spent fuel types. These results are expected to be of value in evaluating the potential for storing defense high-level waste and/or spent fuel in geologic waste repositories.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
5766992
Report Number(s):
SAND-79-0172
TRN: 80-000031
DOE Contract Number:
EY-76-C-04-0789
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES; AFTER-HEAT; RADIOISOTOPES; BWR TYPE REACTORS; COMPUTER CODES; GEOLOGIC DEPOSITS; PWR TYPE REACTORS; RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL; RADIOACTIVE WASTE FACILITIES; S CODES; SOLID WASTES; SPENT FUELS; ENERGY SOURCES; FUELS; ISOTOPES; MANAGEMENT; NUCLEAR FACILITIES; NUCLEAR FUELS; RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS; RADIOACTIVE WASTES; REACTOR MATERIALS; REACTORS; WASTE DISPOSAL; WASTE MANAGEMENT; WASTES; WATER COOLED REACTORS; WATER MODERATED REACTORS; 052002* - Nuclear Fuels- Waste Disposal & Storage

Citation Formats

Sutherland, S.H., and Bennett, D.E. Defense high-level waste and spent fuel characterization for geologic waste repositories. United States: N. p., 1979. Web. doi:10.2172/5766992.
Sutherland, S.H., & Bennett, D.E. Defense high-level waste and spent fuel characterization for geologic waste repositories. United States. doi:10.2172/5766992.
Sutherland, S.H., and Bennett, D.E. Sat . "Defense high-level waste and spent fuel characterization for geologic waste repositories". United States. doi:10.2172/5766992. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/5766992.
@article{osti_5766992,
title = {Defense high-level waste and spent fuel characterization for geologic waste repositories},
author = {Sutherland, S.H. and Bennett, D.E.},
abstractNote = {Results of SANDIA-ORIGEN calculations are given for the total thermal output and radionuclide content, up to 100,000 years decay time, for defense high-level waste expected from the Savannah River Plant, the Hanford Reservation and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and for one pressurized water reactor and five boiling water reactor spent fuel types. These results are expected to be of value in evaluating the potential for storing defense high-level waste and/or spent fuel in geologic waste repositories.},
doi = {10.2172/5766992},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 1979},
month = {Sat Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 1979}
}

Technical Report:

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  • Sandia Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, is presently characterizing the thermal and radiation sources of Department of Energy high-level defense waste (HLDW) and light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel (SF) which ultimately may be retrievably stored at federal geologic waste repositories (GWR). This HLDW and SF characterization is of particular importance in evaluating the long term impact (up to 100,000 years) of storing the thermally active materials in the GWR. Possible consequences of the thermal energy generation by the HLDW and SF stored in the GWR which are being studied include water migration near the waste canisters or fuel assemblies, thermally acceleratedmore » room closure (which is of particular interest if the storage site is located in salt formations), and the stressing of surrounding geologic formations caused by thermal expansion and the heating of aquifers. There is considerable uncertainty involved in characterizing the HLDW which eventually may be emplaced in the GWR. The characterization of commercial SF is a more adequately defined problem. The thermal history of the SF has been obtained by determining ''typical'' burn cycles experienced by the SF and modeling the burn cycles and subsequent SF decays utilizing the ORIGEN code. The ''typical'' PWR burn cycle analyzed involved the 3-year, 3-cycle burn of 3.3% /sup 235/U enriched fresh fuel. Total burnup in this case was 15,000 megawatt-days/assembly (MWD/SA). ''Typical'' BWR burn cycles have been defined and result in six distinct SF types with total burnups ranging from 4500 MWD/SA to 5600 MWD/Sa. It is recognized that the long-term thermal energy generation by HLDW and SF is of considerable importance to GWR. The thermal source histories for SF and HLDW are being developed in order to assist in the design and evaluation of geologic waste repositories.« less
  • This report summarizes activities to determine repository conditions for temperatures, pressure, fluid, chemical, and radiation environments that are expected to exist in commercial and defense high-level nuclear waste and spent fuel repositories in salt. These conditions were generated by the Reference Repository Conditions Interface Working Group (RRC-IWG), an ad hoc IWG established by the National Waste Terminal Storage Program's (NWTS) Isolation Interface Control Board (I-ICB). These repository conditions are based on the standard room-and-pillar mined repository concept with waste emplaced in vertical holes drilled in the room floor. Some important results obtained are given below for selected local areal thermalmore » loadings of 25, 25, and 11.6 W/m/sup 2/ for spent fuel (SF), commercial high-level waste (CHLW) and defense high-level waste (DHLW), respectively. In all cases, the results below are given in order for SF, CHLW, and DHLW. Some thermal results are: maximum waste temperature - 190, 320, and 100 C; maximum canister surface temperature - 160, 260, and 90 C; and maximum rock temperature - 150, 160, and 80C. The length of significant thermal exposure is greater for SF than the other wastes. Thermal histories are given in the report. Vapor phase pressures are not expected to rise significantly above atmospheric pressure until the repository is sealed. After sealing, the pressure will gradually increase to approach lithostatic equilibrium. Estimated volumes of accumulation of brine from thermal migration for 1000 years are 3 to 4 liters, 8 liters, and 0.5 liter. Reference brine compositions are given, although actual brine compositions are strongly site dependent. The maximum absorbed gamma radiation dose delivered to the salt after 10/sup 4/ year is 1.6 x 10/sup 10/ rads, and 9.6 x 10/sup 8/ rads for the CHLW and SF canisters, respectively. 12 figures, 5 tables.« less
  • This report summarizes activities to determine conditions for temperature, pressure, fluid, chemical, and radiation environments typical of those that may be expected to exist in commercial and defense high-level nuclear waste and spent fuel repositories in crystalline rock. These conditions were generated by the Reference Repository Conditions Interface Working Group (RRC-IWG), an ad hoc IWG established by the National Terminal Storage (NWTS) Program's Isolation Interface Control Board. The repository conditions are based on the standard room-and-pillar mined repository concept with waste emplaced in vertical holes drilled in the room floor. Some important results obtained are given below for the selectedmore » local areal thermal loadings of 20, 25, and 13.5 W/m/sup 2/ for spent fuel (SF), commercial high-level waste (CHLW), and defense high-level waste (DHLW), respectively. In all cases, the results below are given in order for SF, CHLW, and DHLW. Some thermal results are: maximum waste temperature - 190, 225, and 120/sup 0/C; maximum rock temperature - 150, 165, and 105/sup 0/C. The length of time for significant thermal exposure is greater for SF than the other wastes. Vapor phase pressures are not expected to rise significantly above atmospheric until the repository is sealed. After sealing, the water pressure inside the sealed excavations will gradually increase to the local hydrostatic head. A generic crystalline rock ground-water composition, and expected gamma radiation dose rates are also provided in the report.« less
  • This report summarizes activities to determine conditions for temperature, pressure, fluid, chemical, and radiation environments typical of those that may be expected to exist in commercial and defense high-level nuclear waste and spent fuel repositories in crystalline rock. In the DOE Crystalline Repository Project, the term crystalline rocks are defined as intrusive igneous and high-rank metamorphic rocks rich in silicate minerals with a grain size sufficiently coarse that individual materials can be distinguished with the unaided eye. These conditions were generated by the Reference Repository Conditions Interface Working Group (RRC-IWG), an ad hoc IWG established by the National Terminal Storagemore » (NWTS) Program's Isolation Interface Control Board. The repository conditions are based on the standard room-and-pillar mined repository concept with waste emplaced in vertical holes drilled in the room floor. Some important results obtained are given below for the selected local areal thermal loadings of 20, 25, and 13.5 W/m/sup 2/ for spent fuel (SF), commercial high-level waste (CHLW), and defense high-level waste (DHLW), respectively. In all cases, the results below are given in order for SF, CHLW, and DHLW. Some thermal results are: maximum waste temperature - 190, 225, and 120/sup 0/C; maximum rock temperature - 150, 165, and 105/sup 0/C. The length of time for significant thermal exposure is greater for SF than the other wastes. Vapor phase pressures are not expected to rise significantly above atmospheric until the repository is sealed. After sealing, the water pressure inside the sealed excavations will gradually increase to the local hydrostatic head. A generic crystalline rock ground-water composition and expected gamma radiation dose rates are also provided in the report. 11 references, 10 figures, 6 tables.« less