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Title: Calibration and postlaunch performance of the Meteor 3/TOMS instrument

Abstract

Prelaunch and postlaunch calibration results for the Meteor 3/total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) instrument are presented here. Ozone amounts are retrieved from measurements of Earth albedo in the 312- to 380-nm range. The accuracy of albedo measurements is primarily tied to knowledge of the reflective properties of diffusers used in the calibrations and to the instrument`s wavelength selection. These and other important prelaunch calibrations are presented. Their estimated accuracies are within the bounds necessary to determine column ozone to better than 1%. However, postlaunch validation results indicate some prelaunch calibration uncertainties may be larger than originally estimated. Instrument calibrations have been maintained postlaunch to within a corresponding 1% error in retrieved ozone. Onboard calibrations, including wavelength monitoring and a three-diffuser solar measurement system, are described and specific results are presented. Other issues, such as the effects of orbital precession on calibration and recent chopper wheel malfunctions, are also discussed.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Hughes STX Corp., Greenbelt, MD (United States)|[NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)|[Orbital Sciences Corp., Pomona, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Greenbelt, MD (United States). Goddard Space Flight Center
OSTI Identifier:
57393
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Geophysical Research; Journal Volume: 100; Journal Issue: D2; Other Information: PBD: Feb 1995
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; STRATOSPHERE; ADVECTION; OZONE; ANNUAL VARIATIONS; MAPPING

Citation Formats

Jaross, G., Krueger, A., Cebula, R.P., Seftor, C., Hartmann, U., Haring, R., and Burchfield, D. Calibration and postlaunch performance of the Meteor 3/TOMS instrument. United States: N. p., 1995. Web. doi:10.1029/94JD02317.
Jaross, G., Krueger, A., Cebula, R.P., Seftor, C., Hartmann, U., Haring, R., & Burchfield, D. Calibration and postlaunch performance of the Meteor 3/TOMS instrument. United States. doi:10.1029/94JD02317.
Jaross, G., Krueger, A., Cebula, R.P., Seftor, C., Hartmann, U., Haring, R., and Burchfield, D. 1995. "Calibration and postlaunch performance of the Meteor 3/TOMS instrument". United States. doi:10.1029/94JD02317.
@article{osti_57393,
title = {Calibration and postlaunch performance of the Meteor 3/TOMS instrument},
author = {Jaross, G. and Krueger, A. and Cebula, R.P. and Seftor, C. and Hartmann, U. and Haring, R. and Burchfield, D.},
abstractNote = {Prelaunch and postlaunch calibration results for the Meteor 3/total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) instrument are presented here. Ozone amounts are retrieved from measurements of Earth albedo in the 312- to 380-nm range. The accuracy of albedo measurements is primarily tied to knowledge of the reflective properties of diffusers used in the calibrations and to the instrument`s wavelength selection. These and other important prelaunch calibrations are presented. Their estimated accuracies are within the bounds necessary to determine column ozone to better than 1%. However, postlaunch validation results indicate some prelaunch calibration uncertainties may be larger than originally estimated. Instrument calibrations have been maintained postlaunch to within a corresponding 1% error in retrieved ozone. Onboard calibrations, including wavelength monitoring and a three-diffuser solar measurement system, are described and specific results are presented. Other issues, such as the effects of orbital precession on calibration and recent chopper wheel malfunctions, are also discussed.},
doi = {10.1029/94JD02317},
journal = {Journal of Geophysical Research},
number = D2,
volume = 100,
place = {United States},
year = 1995,
month = 2
}
  • The currently archived (1989) total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) and solar backscattered ultraviolet (SBUV) total ozone data (version 5) show a global average decrease of about 9.0% from November 1978 to November 1988. This large decrease disagrees with an approximate 3.5% decrease estimated from the ground-based Dobson network. The primary source of disagreement was found to arise from an overestimate of reflectivity change and its incorrect wavelengths dependence for the diffuser plate used when measuring solar irradiance. For total ozone measured by TOMS, a means has been found to use the measured radiance-irradiance ratio from several wavelengths pairs to constructmore » an internally self consistent calibration. The method uses the wavelength dependence of the sensitivity to calibration errors and the requirement that albedo ratios for each wavelength pair yield the same total ozone amounts. Smaller errors in determining spacecraft attitude, synchronization problems with the photon counting electronics, and sea glint contamination of boundary reflectivity data have been corrected or minimized. New climatological low-ozone profiles have been incorporated into the TOMS algorithm that are appropriate for Antarctic ozone hole conditions and other low ozone cases. The combined corrections have led to a new determination of the global average total ozone trend (version 6) as a 2.9 {plus minus} 1.3% decrease over 11 years. Version 6 data are shown to be in agreement within error limits with the average of 39 ground-based Dobson stations and with the world standard Dobson spectrometer 83 at Mauna Loa, Hawaii.« less