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Title: High-G accelerometer for earth-penetrator weapons applications. LDRD final report

Abstract

Micromachining technologies, or Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS), enable the develop of low-cost devices capable of sensing motion in a reliable and accurate manner. Sandia has developed a MEMS fabrication process for integrating both the micromechanical structures and microelectronics circuitry of surface micromachined sensors, such as silicon accelerometers, on the same chip. Integration of the micromechanical sensor elements with microelectronics provides substantial performance and reliability advantages for MEMS accelerometers. A design team at Sandia was assembled to develop a micromachined silicon accelerometer capable of surviving and measuring very high accelerations (up to 50,000 times the acceleration due to gravity). The Sandia integrated surface micromachining process was selected for fabrication of the sensor due to the extreme measurement sensitivity potential associated with integrated microelectronics. Very fine measurement sensitivity was required due to the very small accelerometer proof mass (< 200 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} gram) obtainable with this surface micromachining process. The small proof mass corresponded to small sensor deflections which required very sensitive electronics to enable accurate acceleration measurement over a range of 1,000 to 50,000 times the acceleration due to gravity. Several prototype sensors, based on a suspended plate mass configuration, were developed and the details of the design, modeling, fabrication andmore » validation of the device will be presented in this paper. The device was analyzed using both conventional lumped parameter modeling techniques and finite element analysis tools. The device was tested and performed well over its design range (the device was tested over a range of a few thousand G to 46,000 G, where 1 G equals the acceleration due to gravity).« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
573342
Report Number(s):
SAND-98-0510
ON: DE98002823; TRN: AHC29807%%112
DOE Contract Number:  
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Mar 1998
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
45 MILITARY TECHNOLOGY, WEAPONRY, AND NATIONAL DEFENSE; 44 INSTRUMENTATION, INCLUDING NUCLEAR AND PARTICLE DETECTORS; ACCELEROMETERS; WEAPONS; PROGRESS REPORT; MINIATURIZATION; EARTH PENETRATORS; MILITARY EQUIPMENT; DESIGN; PERFORMANCE TESTING

Citation Formats

Davies, B.R., Montague, S., Bateman, V.I., Brown, F.A., Chanchani, R., Christenson, T., Murray, J.R., Rey, D., and Ryerson, D. High-G accelerometer for earth-penetrator weapons applications. LDRD final report. United States: N. p., 1998. Web. doi:10.2172/573342.
Davies, B.R., Montague, S., Bateman, V.I., Brown, F.A., Chanchani, R., Christenson, T., Murray, J.R., Rey, D., & Ryerson, D. High-G accelerometer for earth-penetrator weapons applications. LDRD final report. United States. doi:10.2172/573342.
Davies, B.R., Montague, S., Bateman, V.I., Brown, F.A., Chanchani, R., Christenson, T., Murray, J.R., Rey, D., and Ryerson, D. Sun . "High-G accelerometer for earth-penetrator weapons applications. LDRD final report". United States. doi:10.2172/573342. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/573342.
@article{osti_573342,
title = {High-G accelerometer for earth-penetrator weapons applications. LDRD final report},
author = {Davies, B.R. and Montague, S. and Bateman, V.I. and Brown, F.A. and Chanchani, R. and Christenson, T. and Murray, J.R. and Rey, D. and Ryerson, D.},
abstractNote = {Micromachining technologies, or Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS), enable the develop of low-cost devices capable of sensing motion in a reliable and accurate manner. Sandia has developed a MEMS fabrication process for integrating both the micromechanical structures and microelectronics circuitry of surface micromachined sensors, such as silicon accelerometers, on the same chip. Integration of the micromechanical sensor elements with microelectronics provides substantial performance and reliability advantages for MEMS accelerometers. A design team at Sandia was assembled to develop a micromachined silicon accelerometer capable of surviving and measuring very high accelerations (up to 50,000 times the acceleration due to gravity). The Sandia integrated surface micromachining process was selected for fabrication of the sensor due to the extreme measurement sensitivity potential associated with integrated microelectronics. Very fine measurement sensitivity was required due to the very small accelerometer proof mass (< 200 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} gram) obtainable with this surface micromachining process. The small proof mass corresponded to small sensor deflections which required very sensitive electronics to enable accurate acceleration measurement over a range of 1,000 to 50,000 times the acceleration due to gravity. Several prototype sensors, based on a suspended plate mass configuration, were developed and the details of the design, modeling, fabrication and validation of the device will be presented in this paper. The device was analyzed using both conventional lumped parameter modeling techniques and finite element analysis tools. The device was tested and performed well over its design range (the device was tested over a range of a few thousand G to 46,000 G, where 1 G equals the acceleration due to gravity).},
doi = {10.2172/573342},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1998},
month = {3}
}