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Title: Improved portable lighting for visual aircraft inspection

Abstract

The most common tool used by aircraft inspectors is the personal flashlight. While it is compact and very portable, it is generally typified by poor beam quality which can interfere with the ability for an inspector to detect small defects and anomalies, such as cracks and corrosion sites, which may be indicators of major structural problems. A Light Shaping Diffuser{trademark} (LSD) installed in a stock flashlight as a replacement to the lens can improve the uniformity of an average flashlight and improve the quality of the inspection. Field trials at aircraft maintenance facilities have demonstrated general acceptance of the LSD by aircraft inspection and maintenance personnel.

Authors:
 [1]; ;  [2]
  1. Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)
  2. Physical Optics Corp., Torrance, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
Department of Transportation, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
57178
Report Number(s):
SAND-95-0562C; CONF-9506126-1
ON: DE95009855; TRN: 95:004138
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Conference on nondestructive evaluation of aging infrastructure, Oakland, CA (United States), 6-8 Jun 1995; Other Information: PBD: [1995]
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; LIGHT SOURCES; ILLUMINANCE; LENSES; AIRCRAFT; INSPECTION; MAINTENANCE; PORTABLE EQUIPMENT; RECOMMENDATIONS; DIFFUSERS; FIELD TESTS; PERFORMANCE TESTING; VISIBILITY

Citation Formats

Shagam, R.N., Lerner, J., and Shie, R. Improved portable lighting for visual aircraft inspection. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Shagam, R.N., Lerner, J., & Shie, R. Improved portable lighting for visual aircraft inspection. United States.
Shagam, R.N., Lerner, J., and Shie, R. Sat . "Improved portable lighting for visual aircraft inspection". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_57178,
title = {Improved portable lighting for visual aircraft inspection},
author = {Shagam, R.N. and Lerner, J. and Shie, R.},
abstractNote = {The most common tool used by aircraft inspectors is the personal flashlight. While it is compact and very portable, it is generally typified by poor beam quality which can interfere with the ability for an inspector to detect small defects and anomalies, such as cracks and corrosion sites, which may be indicators of major structural problems. A Light Shaping Diffuser{trademark} (LSD) installed in a stock flashlight as a replacement to the lens can improve the uniformity of an average flashlight and improve the quality of the inspection. Field trials at aircraft maintenance facilities have demonstrated general acceptance of the LSD by aircraft inspection and maintenance personnel.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EST 1995},
month = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EST 1995}
}

Conference:
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